Using radiobutton for checkable QGroupBox?



  • i want to put radiobutton as the title of checkable QGroupBox, how can i do it? I google it, someone says drawing it yourself><...
    is there a more easier and straightforward way to do this? can i do it using the stylesheet( dont know how at least for myself... )



  • I don't think there is an easy way. The only thing I can think of, is using a proxy style or, as you say, using style sheets and the ::indicator subcontrol.

    However, it seems like a weird UI at first sight. Perhaps you want to rethink your idea. Generally, radiobuttons should be put directly under each other, because otherwise it is very hard for a user to grasp the idea that it is an exclusive group of options. In your design, you automatically create a lot of space between the radio buttons, interspaced even with other widgets. That would, IMHO, be hard to use.

    If you have a set of exclusive choices, and each needs its own specific configuration, then perhaps you can considder a non-editable combo box with a QStackedWidget that presents a page of settings for each of the options in the combo box, or something along those lines.



  • Au contraire, my friend...

    Checkable, autoexclusive groupboxes looking like radiobuttons would be greatly useful.
    Really often, I find myself wishing I could use them.

    The resulting interface would be totally neat and clear,

    like:

    @Choose your meal:

    (x) Standard -----------

     ( ) Meatballs
     (x) Beef spaghetti
    
     [ ] Extra cheese cake
    

    ( ) Vegan --------------

     ( ) Broccoli
     ( ) Tomato macaroni
     ( ) Just grass
    
     [ ] Extra coffee
    

    .
    @

    The above makes it clear at a glance (at least, to me) what options you have, and the sub-options
    (yes the coffee is only available to vegans here).

    The top-level alternatives (here: Standard and Vegan) are visually linked not by proximity, but by the layout, which works just as well.

    That solution can be preferable to the suggested "combo-box with hidden widgets", because it revels it all without requiring the user to fiddle with the interface.

    (also, the "combo-box" could be misleading, e.g. here it could suggest that you can order something from the standard and something from the vegan menu in the same meal -- just as you would do if Standard and Vegan were two tabs in a multi-paged tabbed widget).

    Too bad it is so hacky to get that in QT!



  • [quote author="mtarini" date="1346971755"]

    Too bad it is so hacky to get that in QT!

    [/quote]

    Are there any other SDK's that provide something like this standard?

    Also, just one minor correction, QT is "QuickTime", Qt is what you are looking for :)



  • Sorry, but that UI looks still weird to me. What happens if after I have selected what you have selected, I then change my mind and select Broccoli instead? The Meatballs are disabled, but still selected! That is just weird. Also, I stand by my claim that the radio buttons need to be close together in order to be usable. Interspacing them with different lists is really not a good idea.

    For your use case, i'd use a list with grouping headers in between and a radio button before each item (but not before each header).


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