Qt Programming Language


  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    Hi
    What is the finished script ?
    Should it be a document with formatting ?
    Or can a text format do it ?

    There is the QTextEdit Class that can display rich text but what format would the end user want to have the script in ?



  • @mrjj said in Qt Programming Language:

    Hi and welcome
    You can also create widgets directly from code, using normal c++.

    So to create a button

    one would simply do
    QButton *mybutt= new QButton(this);

    Creator uses UI files which are xml files.
    It then reads and convert these to c++ code.
    So there is no text syntax as such for creating interfaces in text.

    You could in theory write the UI syntax directly, but it is most likely not
    very fun.

    Many do not use Creator / Designer at all and write the code directly so yes, it is
    very possible to do.

    So the "*mybutt" part of the "QButton *mybutt= new QButton(this);" code is where I would type a name for the button? For example, QButton *Next= new QButton(this);
    How about for radio buttons and checkboxes?


  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    There's QRadioButton and QCheckBox.



  • @SGaist said in Qt Programming Language:

    There's QRadioButton and QCheckBox.

    When I create those widgets, how would I name them? For example, how would I translate the following code into Qt Widgets?

    							<label class="radio"><input checked="checked" name="basicInfo[spouse_one]" value="woman" type="radio"> Bride</label>
    							&nbsp;&nbsp;
    							<label class="radio"><input name="basicInfo[spouse_one]" value="man" type="radio"> Groom</label></br>
    							&nbsp;&nbsp;
    


  • @mrjj said in Qt Programming Language:

    Hi
    What is the finished script ?
    Should it be a document with formatting ?
    Or can a text format do it ?

    There is the QTextEdit Class that can display rich text but what format would the end user want to have the script in ?

    Isn't a "text edit" something the user would write into? For example, when they get to Step 19, which asks the customer to write what they want to choose for the "Introductory Music", "Interlude Music" which can be played at any time during the ceremony, and "Exit Music", those would be separate multiline edit boxes. The finished document would be one that's not editable, so a plain text format would do. The hard part for me would be how I would notate the widgets for paragraphs and sections.



  • @SGaist said in Qt Programming Language:

    There's QRadioButton and QCheckBox.

    How would I translate this example of checkboxes into Qt Widgets? Also, how would I make the tooltips of these checkboxes be spoken as "tutor messages" by a screenreader?

    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="The moments when the Bride/couple approach the altar and exit the wedding venue. Usually accompanied by music and the wedding party.">
    									<input value="processionalRecessional" checked="checked" id="elements-processional-recessional" type="checkbox">
    									Processional/Recessional
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="A short greeting from the minister/officiant explaining the significance of the event.">
    									<input value="welcomeStatement" checked="checked" id="elements-welcome-statement" type="checkbox">
    									Welcome Statement
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="A special moment of the ceremony, often containing a moment of silence, where the minister/officiant offers the guests a chance to honor those who couldn't attend, especially loved ones who are no longer with us. Guests may opt to light candles in honor of the departed.">
    									<input value="memorialCandle" checked="checked" id="elements-memorial-candle" type="checkbox">
    									Honoring The Departed
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="A prayer or call to a higher power or force, often at the opening, as an intercession, or during the closing of the ceremony. This is usually recited by the minister/officiant. Sometimes the guests may be asked to join in.">
    									<input value="Wedding Prayers" checked="checked" id="elements-consecration" type="checkbox">
    									Wedding Prayers
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="Also known as the “Give-Away”, or the “Bridal Presentation”, in which the Bridal Companion (typically her father) “gives”, “brings”, or “presents” her to the groom.">
    									<input value="familyBlessing" checked="checked" id="elements-family-blessing" type="checkbox">
    									Family Blessing
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="A controversial element in which the minister/officiant asks those assembled if they approve of the union. Include with caution!">
    									<input value="speakNow" checked="checked" id="elements-speak-now" type="checkbox">
    									Speak Now
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="A controversial element in which the minister/officiant asks the soon-to-be married couple if they affirm their union. Include with caution!">
    									<input value="chargeToTheCouple" checked="checked" id="elements-charge-to-the-couple" type="checkbox">
    									Charge To The Couple
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="A more elaborate message from the minister/officiant, in which she/he expounds on the virtues of marriage and married life.">
    									<input value="weddingSermon" checked="checked" id="elements-wedding-sermon" type="checkbox">
    									Wedding Sermon
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="The moment where a passage, often a poem, a scripture lesson, or even a song lyric is read, either by the minister/officiant, a guest reader, or even the bride or groom. These can include romantic novel sections, Bible Stories about marriage, love poems, song lyrics about romance, or even passages about how the soon-to-be married couple feels about each other, such as the moment when they first met.">
    									<input value="weddingReadings" checked="checked" id="elements-consecration" type="checkbox">
    									Wedding Readings
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="A short blessing of the ceremony, often containing a prayer or call to a higher power or force.">
    									<input value="consecration" checked="checked" id="elements-consecration" type="checkbox">
    									Consecration
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="It is required by law that a wedding ceremony include a Declaration of Intent to marry between the two individuals electing to join in the marriage contract." This can be in the form of an "I Do", where the minister/officiant asks questions to the soon-to-be married couple beginning with "Do you", and in turn, the couple answers "I do". Or it can be in the form of an "I Will", where the minister/officiant asks questions to the soon-to-be married couple beginning with "Will you", and in turn, the couple answers "I will.".>
    									<input checked="checked" value="declarationOfIntent" id="elements-declaration-of-intent" type="checkbox">
    									Declaration of Intent
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="At this time, the couple exchanges their vows with one another. Often the most emotional part of the wedding. The couple can have a "repeat-after-me", where the minister/officiant read the vows phrase-by-phrase, and they repeat. Or they can have the minister/officiant say the vows in the form of "Do you" or "Will you" questions, in which the couple in turn answers "I Do" or "I Will". The soon-to-be married couple can choose from traditional vows of different denominations, they can even modify them if the ceremony allows, or they can mix and match wordings from different sets of vows if they like. But the beauty of this moment is when soon-to-be married couples often go all out and write their own vows, which they can either render as "I-Do's" or "I-Will's", or a repeat-after-me with the minister/officiant, or they can even read them to each other. Sometimes, if the couple makes vows that are identical, they can often read and say them together.">
    									<input value="exchangeOfVows" id="elements-exchange-of-vows" checked="checked" type="checkbox">
    									Exchange of Vows
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="It has become custom that individuals getting married will exchange rings with one another.">
    									<input value="exchangeOfRings" id="elements-exchange-of-rings" checked="checked" type="checkbox">
    									Exchange of Rings
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="The minister/officiant officially declares the couple as having been legally wed.">
    									<input value="pronouncement" id="elements-pronouncement" checked="checked" type="checkbox">
    									Pronouncement
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="Often, the couple will elect to exchange a kiss with one another after they've been declared married.">
    									<input value="kiss" id="elements-kiss" checked="checked" type="checkbox">
    									Kiss
    								</span>
    							</label>
    
    							<label class="checkbox">
    								<span data-tooltip="At this time, the minister/officiant has the opportunity to present the newlyweds to the guests before they exit.">
    									<input value="presentation" id="elements-presentation" checked="checked" type="checkbox">
    									Presentation
    								</span>
    							</label>
    

  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    You can set a tooltip on widgets.

    If you'd like something different for the accessibly description there's a property for that too. By default it uses what you put in the tool tip.

    From your description it seems your application could make use of QFormLayout to put your "wedding editor" in shape.



  • For the "Baptism Ceremony Builder" part of my Ceremony script generator, how would I make a single-line edit box who's label changes depending on which radio button is selected. For example, if the "Infant" or "Child" radio button is selected, the edit box would be named "Child", and if either "Youth" or "Adult" is selected, the same edit box would be named "Participant". This is of course where the customer would put the name of the child/participant being presented in the baptism/christening/dedication/naming ceremony. Same thing goes for the boxes named "Parent 1" (or "Sponsor 1") and "Parent 2" (or "Sponsor 2"). Also, how would I automatically fill in gender appropriate nouns and pronouns in the finished text based on the gender selected (Male or Female)?


  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    That's where signals and slots comes into play. For each control proposing a choice you will have a slot that will modify your UI based on the state/choice of the control that was just modified.



  • @SGaist said in Qt Programming Language:

    That's where signals and slots comes into play. For each control proposing a choice you will have a slot that will modify your UI based on the state/choice of the control that was just modified.

    I would appreciate if you could please be so kind as to give me an example of code as to what this will look like. Also, here's a bit of an example of Qt widget code I've put together. Please tell me if this looks right. If there's anything I need to change in my code, please let me know.

    QButtonGroup
    QRadioButton *button = new QRadioButton ("Bride", this);
    QRadioButton *button = new QRadioButton ("Groom", this);
    QLineEdit *lineEdit = new QLineEdit ("Spouse 1 Name", this);
    QButtonGroup
    QRadioButton *button = new QRadioButton ("Bride", this);
    QRadioButton *button = new QRadioButton ("Groom", this);
    QLineEdit *lineEdit = new QLineEdit ("Spouse 2 Name", this);
    QPushButton *button = new QPushButton ("Back", this);
    QPushButton *button = new QPushButton ("Next", this);
    

  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    Do you want to build something like a QWizard ?



  • @SGaist said in Qt Programming Language:

    Do you want to build something like a QWizard ?

    I guess you could say that. Then when customers come to the last step, the "Download" button would be like the "Finish" button of an Installation Program if you like. So when customers click the "Download" button, a finished document appears on their screen. Then there could be a "Print" button, and a "Save" button.


  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    There's something that is not exactly clear. Do you want to write an application that people install on there computer to generate these scripts ? Or should they go to some sort of web site ?



  • @SGaist said in Qt Programming Language:

    There's something that is not exactly clear. Do you want to write an application that people install on there computer to generate these scripts ? Or should they go to some sort of web site ?

    It's the former. I want to build an application that people install on their computer.


  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    Ok, then I'd recommend breaking your current design in logical pieces. For example, there's no need to double the number of widget to handle both spouse names. You can create one widget for that part and then have two instances of it in your "main widget".



  • @SGaist said in Qt Programming Language:

    Ok, then I'd recommend breaking your current design in logical pieces. For example, there's no need to double the number of widget to handle both spouse names. You can create one widget for that part and then have two instances of it in your "main widget".

    Two instances of the same widget? I'm confused! Could you please tell me exactly how I could do that? Here's a bit of code, I don't know if this is what you want me to try.

    QFormLayout *form = newQFormLayout:
    SetWindowTitle(tr("Step 2");
    resize(480, 320);
    }
    QButtonGroup *buttonGroup = new buttonGroup(tr("Spouse 1 Gender")
    QRadioButton *radio1 = new QRadioButton ("Bride", this);
    QRadioButton *radio2 = new QRadioButton ("Groom", this);
    radio1->setChecked(true)
    QLineEdit *Spouse1NameEdit = new QLineEdit (this);
    QLabel *NameLabel = new QLabel("Spouse 1 Name", this);
    NameLabel->setBuddy(Spouse1NameEdit);
    QButtonGroup *buttonGroup = new buttonGroup(tr("Spouse 2 Gender")
    QRadioButton *radio3 = new QRadioButton ("Bride", this);
    QRadioButton *radio4 = new QRadioButton ("Groom", this);
    radio4->setChecked(true)
    QLineEdit *Spouse2NameEdit = new QLineEdit (this);
    QLabel *NameLabel = new QLabel("Spouse 2 Name", this);
    NameLabel->setBuddy(Spouse2NameEdit);
    QPushButton *button = new QPushButton ("Back", this);
    QPushButton *button = new QPushButton ("Next", this);
    
    I also want to find out, how do I put the following text into the beginning of the window when the customer gets to this specific screen.
    
    "The Basics: To begin, enter the first names of the couple, the last name(s) they'll be using after their marriage, and the city/town, then select the state/province, and country in which the wedding will take place."
    

    Same goes for any of the other screens up to the "Finish" screen. The text of the "Finish" screen will say:

    "Congratulations! You just built a one-of-a-kind wedding ceremony. Click the "Download" button to read your wedding script in the wizard. Click the "Save" button to save your script in any text format on your computer. Click the "Print" button to send your script to your printer." The kind of ceremony changes, depending on what is selected in the "Welcome" screen. Either a "Wedding Ceremony", a "Baptism Ceremony", or a "Funeral Ceremony".

  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    You can use a QLabel when you want to show some text.

    What I meant is something like:

    class SpouseWidget : public QWidget {
        Q_OBJECT
    public:
        enum Gender {
            Bride,
            Groom
        }
    public:
        SpouseWidget(QWidget *parent = 0);
        QString name() const;
        Gender gender() const;
    
    private:
         QLineEdit *nameLineEdit;
        QButtonGroup *genderButtonGroup;
    };
    
    SpouseWidget::SpouseWidget(QWidget *parent):
        QWidget(parent),
        nameLineEdit(new QLineEdit),
        genderButtonGroup(new QButtonGroup(this)
    
        QRadioButton *brideButton = new QRadioButton (tr("Bride"));
        brideButton->setProperty("gender", SpouseWidget::Bride);
        bride->setChecked(true);
        QRadioButton *groomButton = new QRadioButton (tr("Groom"));
        groomButton->setProperty("gender", SpouseWidget::Groom);
    
        genderButtonGroup->add(brideButton);
        genderButtonGroup->add(groomButton);
        QHBoxLayout *genderLayout = new QHBoxLayout;
        genderLayout->addWidget(brideButton);
        genderLayout->addWidget(groomButton);
    
        QFormLayout *layout = new QFormLayout(this);
        layout->addRow(tr("Name"), nameLineEdit);
        layout->addRow(tr("Gender"), genderLayout);
    }
    
    QString SpouseWidget::name() const 
    {
        return nameLineEdit->text();
    }
    
    SpouseWidget::Gender SpouseWidget::gender() const
    {
        QAbstractButton *button = genderButtonGroup->checkedButton();
        QVariant genderVariant = button->property("gender");
        return genderVariant.value<SpouseWidget::Gender>()
    }
    

    Then in your page you can use a QGroupBox for each spouse with an instance of SpouseWidget inside.



  • I also want to find out, how do I put the following text into the beginning of the window when the customer gets to this specific screen.

    "The Basics: To begin, enter the first names of the couple, the last name(s) they'll be using after their marriage, and the city/town, then select the
    state/province, and country in which the wedding will take place."
    Same goes for any of the other screens up to the "Finish" screen. The text of the "Finish" screen will say:

    "Congratulations! You just built a one-of-a-kind wedding ceremony. Click the "Download" button to read your wedding script in the wizard. Click the "Save"
    button to save your script in any text format on your computer. Click the "Print" button to send your script to your printer." The kind of ceremony changes,
    depending on what is selected in the "Welcome" screen. Either a "Wedding Ceremony", a "Baptism Ceremony", or a "Funeral Ceremony".



  • @SGaist said in Qt Programming Language:

    You can use a QLabel when you want to show some text.

    What I meant is something like:

    class SpouseWidget : public QWidget {
        Q_OBJECT
    public:
        enum Gender {
            Bride,
            Groom
        }
    public:
        SpouseWidget(QWidget *parent = 0);
        QString name() const;
        Gender gender() const;
    
    private:
         QLineEdit *nameLineEdit;
        QButtonGroup *genderButtonGroup;
    };
    
    SpouseWidget::SpouseWidget(QWidget *parent):
        QWidget(parent),
        nameLineEdit(new QLineEdit),
        genderButtonGroup(new QButtonGroup(this)
    
        QRadioButton *brideButton = new QRadioButton (tr("Bride"));
        brideButton->setProperty("gender", SpouseWidget::Bride);
        bride->setChecked(true);
        QRadioButton *groomButton = new QRadioButton (tr("Groom"));
        groomButton->setProperty("gender", SpouseWidget::Groom);
    
        genderButtonGroup->add(brideButton);
        genderButtonGroup->add(groomButton);
        QHBoxLayout *genderLayout = new QHBoxLayout;
        genderLayout->addWidget(brideButton);
        genderLayout->addWidget(groomButton);
    
        QFormLayout *layout = new QFormLayout(this);
        layout->addRow(tr("Name"), nameLineEdit);
        layout->addRow(tr("Gender"), genderLayout);
    }
    
    QString SpouseWidget::name() const 
    {
        return nameLineEdit->text();
    }
    
    SpouseWidget::Gender SpouseWidget::gender() const
    {
        QAbstractButton *button = genderButtonGroup->checkedButton();
        QVariant genderVariant = button->property("gender");
        return genderVariant.value<SpouseWidget::Gender>()
    }
    

    Then in your page you can use a QGroupBox for each spouse with an instance of SpouseWidget inside.

    After I compile all my widgets in Notepad++, how would I turn them into an executable program?


  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    You can use a QLabel to show the text and add it at the bottom of the QFormLayout without specifying a text.

    As for your question with Notepad++, maybe using this plugin ?



  • @SGaist said in Qt Programming Language:

    You can use a QLabel to show the text and add it at the bottom of the QFormLayout without specifying a text.

    As for your question with Notepad++, maybe using this plugin ?

    Could you please explain what you mean when you say, "You can use a QLabel to show the text and add it at the bottom of the QFormLayout without specifying a text."? I'm a bit confused on that one!



  • @SGaist said in Qt Programming Language:

    You can use a QLabel to show the text and add it at the bottom of the QFormLayout without specifying a text.

    As for your question with Notepad++, maybe using this plugin ?

    I tried installing that plugin, but when I launched Notepad++, a screen popped up with a message telling me that the plugin isn't compatible with the version of Notepad++ I have. Is that because I have a newer version of Notepad++? I'm confused on that one!


  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    Like shown in my sample widget, you should use layouts in order to place your widgets around in your application. Therefore my suggestion, put your text into a QLabel with setText and then put that label at the appropriate place within the layout.

    As for the plugin, it might be out of date regarding the version of Notepad++. If possible, I'd recommend using Qt Creator in order to build your application. It would likely make things easier.



  • How would I be able to use QT Creator to make my project? Would I put the code I've already made in Notepad++ into a new project in Qt Creator? What would I do?



  • @SGaist said in Qt Programming Language:

    Like shown in my sample widget, you should use layouts in order to place your widgets around in your application. Therefore my suggestion, put your text into a QLabel with setText and then put that label at the appropriate place within the layout.

    As for the plugin, it might be out of date regarding the version of Notepad++. If possible, I'd recommend using Qt Creator in order to build your application. It would likely make things easier.

    I can't access Qt Creator with my screenreader, JAWS (Job Access With Speech). That's why I'm making the code in Notepad++. I just wish I knew how to make the finished program.



  • I'm still a bit stuck on this Qt Programming Language. Since I can't access Qt Creator with my JAWS screenreader, as it doesn't recognize image-based icons, how else can I create a finished program after compiling the source code in Notepad++? Anybody have any answers for me?


  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    @Annabelle
    So you can compile it already?
    Or is it the compiling part that is hard to do ?

    Can the JAWS read a command prompt ?



  • I'm still a bit confused on how to make the finished program. I can't access the Qt Creator, since my screenreader, or any screenreaders, for that matter, won't recognize image-based icons. Is there a way for someone blind like me to create a finished program such as the app I'm putting together, after compiling the source code in Notepad++?


  • Moderators

    Do you have the code ready, with a .pro file (it is a project definition file that Qt uses to compile applications)? If yes, then you can compile your project from the command line. Open cmd.exe (I guess you are on Windows operating system) and type:

    qmake yourprojectname.pro
    make
    

    That should be enough, assuming your environment is prepared (qmake and compiler are both set up in PATH system variable).

    As a side note, as far as I know there is an accessibility team working at Qt Company, I'm sure they will be happy to hear how both Qt and Qt Creator can be improved to help blind people. You can try reaching them at qt-creator@qt-project.org. You can also subscribe to Qt Creator mailing list here: http://lists.qt-project.org/mailman/listinfo/qt-creator.



  • @mrjj said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    So you can compile it already?
    Or is it the compiling part that is hard to do ?

    Can the JAWS read a command prompt ?

    I can make the source code, it's the compiling the finished program part that's hard. Yes, JAWS can read a Command Prompt. What do I do in there?



  • Hi, you will need to create a .pro file which gives instructions on how to build your application. http://doc.qt.io/qt-4.8/qmake-project-files.html

    Once you have have this. you can do as instructed by @sierdzio in CMD.



  • @Annabelle Sorry, I was at work when I made my initial response to this thread. A more elaborate answer for you follows as I take it you are beginning in Qt and it may be difficult for you to look up resources.

    Given the scope of your project I think it will suffice to use a simple Qmake project file such as:

    myapp.pro

    TEMPLATE = app
    
    QT += widgets
    
    SOURCES += main.cpp \
        MainWindow.cpp \
        SpouseWidget.cpp
    
    HEADERS += \
        MainWindow.h \
        SpouswWidget.h
    
    OTHER_FILES += \
        anyotherfile.png
    

    You may need to make changes to this in order to fit the needs of your project, but this should be a good enough example for you.

    Once you have this in place, you can open up your favorite Command Line Interface (eg. cmd.exe for Windows).

    Type:

    qmake myapp.pro
    make
    

    Your compiler will generate a binary file for your application at this point.

    I hope this helps,
    Have fun.



  • Another thing I'd like to do is make icons for the push buttons, radio buttons, combo boxes, and checkboxes. I'd like to find out, is it OK for me to use unicode symbols as icons? For example:
    In the welcome screen, there are the following Radio Buttons
    ⚭ (Wedding Ceremony Radio Button)
    ~⛲ (Baptism Ceremony Radio Button)
    ⛼ (Funeral Ceremony Radio Button)
    For the Spouse Genders, there should be the following Icons:
    👰 (Bride Radio Button)
    🤵 (Groom Radio Button)
    For the Baptism Person Types, there should be the following Icons:
    👦👶👧 (Infant Radio Button)
    👦👧 (Child Radio Button)
    👦👨👧👩 (Youth Radio Button)
    👨👴👩👵 (Adult Radio Button)
    For the Funeral Ceremony Types, there should be the following icons:
    ⚰ (Funeral Radio Button)
    ⚱ (Memorial Service Radio Button)
    Note that some of the icons are composed of two or more unicode characters put together, as I couldn't find separate unicode symbols to represent them.



  • You should be able to use QString::fromUtf8() for this: http://doc.qt.io/qt-5/qstring.html#fromUtf8



  • @Allanis said in Qt Programming Language:

    You should be able to use QString::fromUtf8() for this: http://doc.qt.io/qt-5/qstring.html#fromUtf8

    Could you please be so kind as to give me an example of what one of my icons would look like with the QString::fromUtf8() code? For example: 👦👶👧



  • Sure. I'm not sure exactly what you mean. Do you want an image or a code example? either way I whipped up a quick example to demonstrate what it would look like. Here's an image.

    0_1506120620297_annabelle.png

    Given that your first post mentioned you where visually impaired, I think I may have misunderstood your meaning, so here's an example in code:

      QRadioButton* rb = new QRadioButton();
      QString str = QString::fromUtf8("<Utf-8 code> Button Name");
      rb->setText(str);
    

    Where <Utf-8 code> = the character you wish to display.
    Pretty sure there is a nicer way to do it. But I'm off to bed. That should get you started though.



  • @Allanis said in Qt Programming Language:

    Sure. I'm not sure exactly what you mean. Do you want an image or a code example? either way I whipped up a quick example to demonstrate what it would look like. Here's an image.

    0_1506120620297_annabelle.png

    Given that your first post mentioned you where visually impaired, I think I may have misunderstood your meaning, so here's an example in code:

      QRadioButton* rb = new QRadioButton();
      QString str = QString::fromUtf8("<Utf-8 code> Button Name");
      rb->setText(str);
    

    Where <Utf-8 code> = the character you wish to display.
    Pretty sure there is a nicer way to do it. But I'm off to bed. That should get you started though.

    So are you thinking I should write something like:
    QRadioButton* rb = new QRadioButton();
    QString str = QString::fromUtf8("<👰> Button Name");
    rb->setText(str);
    And for "Button Name", would it be something like:
    QRadioButton* rb = new QRadioButton();
    QString str = QString::fromUtf8("<👰> Bride");
    rb->setText(str);
    Something along those lines?



  • Yeah that will work. But remove the <> from around your unicode character. I only placed them their as placeholder. It will work by placing the unicode character in your source file as you have done, but I would recommend finding the value for it instead. I'm replying from my phone so I can't look ot up for you.



  • @Allanis said in Qt Programming Language:

    Yeah that will work. But remove the <> from around your unicode character. I only placed them their as placeholder. It will work by placing the unicode character in your source file as you have done, but I would recommend finding the value for it instead. I'm replying from my phone so I can't look ot up for you.

    @Allanis said in Qt Programming Language:

    Yeah that will work. But remove the <> from around your unicode character. I only placed them their as placeholder. It will work by placing the unicode character in your source file as you have done, but I would recommend finding the value for it instead. I'm replying from my phone so I can't look ot up for you.

    By value, do you mean the Unicode value? Or do you mean the hexidecimal value? I'm confused!



  • @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    👰

    Sorry, I wasn't too clear. You should use the UCN for example: '\u2639' will represent ☹
    There can be problems with this as compilers are required to support only the basic source characters. I'm not sure if Qt gives you much help in way of UCN's so if it doesn't display the character for you, use the literal '☹' in your source, and perhaps see if someone else can help you with the use of UCN as I'm not so sure without reading up on it. Perhaps also try reading up on character sets to understand encodings.

    Edit:
    I just checked up the code for 👧

      QString str1 = QString::fromUtf8("\U0001F467 Button 1");
    

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