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Qt Programming Language



  • @Annabelle
    When you did the paste, this time you have accidentally actually copied the actual line numbers 1 to 6 onto lines 1 to 6. This is in addition to the line numbers which VS shows to the left of every line you write, and your screenreader probably reads out to you. Which means that prior to your #include at line 7 the first 6 lines are unacceptable. You need to delete, or change to blank lines, your first 6 lines.

    When you try to compile code, the very first error is highly significant. Once the compiler hits something erroneous, very often it does not do a great a job at "recovering" from the error such that it gives sensible errors (or not) for whatever follows. So you can end up with loads of "spurious" errors after the first one. Concentrate each time on fixing whatever the very first error reported is, then try compiling again and see where it gets you.

    Now, there is an important thing here in VS which I do not know whether you are aware of/your screenreader tells you about. When we look at the lines you have shown us in the screenshot above, we see the lines the compiler does not like having a "squiggly red underline" shown. For us we can immediately see those and know something is wrong. Does your screenreader tell you about these? In your current code, the very first line (numbered 1) has the actual text of the number 1 on it. Since that is wrong, VS squiggle-red-underlines that 1. It would be very helpful to you if your screenreader can make you aware of such lines, but perhaps it cannot? Also, I believe that if I hovered my mouse over a red-squiggle-underline VS would put up a "tooltip" giving me the error message for what is wrong: again, are you able to be informed about that?



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    When you did the paste, this time you have accidentally actually copied the actual line numbers 1 to 6 onto lines 1 to 6. This is in addition to the line numbers which VS shows to the left of every line you write, and your screenreader probably reads out to you. Which means that prior to your #include at line 7 the first 6 lines are unacceptable. You need to delete, or change to blank lines, your first 6 lines.

    When you try to compile code, the very first error is highly significant. Once the compiler hits something erroneous, very often it does not do a great a job at "recovering" from the error such that it gives sensible errors (or not) for whatever follows. So you can end up with loads of "spurious" errors after the first one. Concentrate each time on fixing whatever the very first error reported is, then try compiling again and see where it gets you.

    Now, there is an important thing here in VS which I do not know whether you are aware of/your screenreader tells you about. When we look at the lines you have shown us in the screenshot above, we see the lines the compiler does not like having a "squiggly red underline" shown. For us we can immediately see those and know something is wrong. Does your screenreader tell you about these? In your current code, the very first line (numbered 1) has the actual text of the number 1 on it. Since that is wrong, VS squiggle-red-underlines that 1. It would be very helpful to you if your screenreader can make you aware of such lines, but perhaps it cannot? Also, I believe that if I hovered my mouse over a red-squiggle-underline VS would put up a "tooltip" giving me the error message for what is wrong: again, are you able to be informed about that?

    My screenreader can't tell if an underline has a color or is squigly. It can say _ (underline). Is that the mark you're talking about? I'm confused!



  • Here's a screenshot of yet another error. I'm not sure what I did wrong. I deleted the lines with pasted numbers, but even Visual Studio didn't like something I did then.
    0_1541260099015_7152e5c5-4f99-4b63-ab56-23a1c4260150-image.png


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    My screenreader can't tell if an underline has a color or is squigly. It can say _ (underline). Is that the mark you're talking about?

    In your latest screenshot, there was a red squiggly line underneath "#include". Did your screenreader announce that? If not, don't worry -- the error is repeated under the Error List pane: "cannot open source Hello World! file "stdafx.h". Did your screenreader announce that?

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Here's a screenshot of yet another error.

    Change <stdafx.h> to "stdafx.h". In other words, change the angular brackets to double quotation marks.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    My screenreader can't tell if an underline has a color or is squigly. It can say _ (underline). Is that the mark you're talking about?

    In your latest screenshot, there was a red squiggly line underneath "#include". Did your screenreader announce that? If not, don't worry -- the error is repeated under the Error List pane: "cannot open source Hello World! file "stdafx.h". Did your screenreader announce that?

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Here's a screenshot of yet another error.

    Change <stdafx.h> to "stdafx.h". In other words, change the angular brackets to double quotation marks.

    It seems that when I type #include "stdafx.h", the quotation marks, for some reason, are automatically changed to angular brackets (<>). How do I prevent that from happening?



  • How's this?

    0_1541379728064_097a0365-c849-4c61-a942-b48351b6e910-image.png



  • @Annabelle
    This looks fault-free, and seems to have run without error! I don't know where the "Hello world" output went though? On that Output tab you have the Show output from combobox set to Debug, you may have to set that to something else to see/hear the program output?



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    This looks fault-free, and seems to have run without error! I don't know where the "Hello world" output went though? On that Output tab you have the Show output from combobox set to Debug, you may have to set that to something else to see/hear the program output?

    How do I do that, I wonder? After I make the "Hello World" program, what do I do next?



  • @Annabelle
    Ignore my comment about the Debug tab, I think. The question is: when you run the program, it should output Hello world!, where does that output go to? Does it maybe open a console window, send it there, and then close it as soon as your program finishes, all of which would be near "instantaneous"? It may depend on your project type, I don't know. You may need hep on this from VS C++ people here....


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    I don't know where the "Hello world" output went though? On that Output tab you have the Show output from combobox set to Debug, you may have to set that to something else to see/hear the program output?

    How do I do that, I wonder?

    When you run your program (Ctrl + F5), a window should pop up and that window should contain the words "Hello world!". The window will close if you press any key while the window has focus.

    Did JAWS read the contents of that window to you?



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    Ignore my comment about the Debug tab, I think. The question is: when you run the program, it should output Hello world!, where does that output go to? Does it maybe open a console window, send it there, and then close it as soon as your program finishes, all of which would be near "instantaneous"? It may depend on your project type, I don't know. You may need hep on this from VS C++ people here....

    This is what the output window looks like in a screenshot. 0_1541609206448_6d656a50-ae21-4c35-b9e3-89f42a2c7ce5-image.png
    What is the meaning of this message?
    "The program '[2880] Hello World!.exe' has exited with code 0 (0x0)."



  • @Annabelle

    "The program '[2880] Hello World!.exe' has exited with code 0 (0x0)."

    It's just Visual Studio letting you know good news! It's telling you that you just ran your program executable (Hello World!.exe), it ran to completion and exited, and it returned an "exit code" of 0 (which is good, is what your code does, but which you don't care about).

    My question still remains, however. When that program ran it sent the string Hello World! to its "output" (that's the purpose of this program). Where did that "output" go? (I don't use Visual Studio, and with your project type, so I don't know. @JKSH said earlier:

    When you run your program (Ctrl + F5), a window should pop up and that window should contain the words "Hello world!". The window will close if you press any key while the window has focus.
    Did JAWS read the contents of that window to you?

    So how does this behave for you? Did you get to hear about that output? Did you press a key to close a window which had opened?



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle

    "The program '[2880] Hello World!.exe' has exited with code 0 (0x0)."

    It's just Visual Studio letting you know good news! It's telling you that you just ran your program executable (Hello World!.exe), it ran to completion and exited, and it returned an "exit code" of 0 (which is good, is what your code does, but which you don't care about).

    My question still remains, however. When that program ran it sent the string Hello World! to its "output" (that's the purpose of this program). Where did that "output" go? (I don't use Visual Studio, and with your project type, so I don't know. @JKSH said earlier:

    When you run your program (Ctrl + F5), a window should pop up and that window should contain the words "Hello world!". The window will close if you press any key while the window has focus.
    Did JAWS read the contents of that window to you?

    So how does this behave for you? Did you get to hear about that output? Did you press a key to close a window which had opened?

    @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle

    "The program '[2880] Hello World!.exe' has exited with code 0 (0x0)."

    It's just Visual Studio letting you know good news! It's telling you that you just ran your program executable (Hello World!.exe), it ran to completion and exited, and it returned an "exit code" of 0 (which is good, is what your code does, but which you don't care about).

    My question still remains, however. When that program ran it sent the string Hello World! to its "output" (that's the purpose of this program). Where did that "output" go? (I don't use Visual Studio, and with your project type, so I don't know. @JKSH said earlier:

    When you run your program (Ctrl + F5), a window should pop up and that window should contain the words "Hello world!". The window will close if you press any key while the window has focus.
    Did JAWS read the contents of that window to you?

    So how does this behave for you? Did you get to hear about that output? Did you press a key to close a window which had opened?

    @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle

    "The program '[2880] Hello World!.exe' has exited with code 0 (0x0)."

    It's just Visual Studio letting you know good news! It's telling you that you just ran your program executable (Hello World!.exe), it ran to completion and exited, and it returned an "exit code" of 0 (which is good, is what your code does, but which you don't care about).

    My question still remains, however. When that program ran it sent the string Hello World! to its "output" (that's the purpose of this program). Where did that "output" go? (I don't use Visual Studio, and with your project type, so I don't know. @JKSH said earlier:

    When you run your program (Ctrl + F5), a window should pop up and that window should contain the words "Hello world!". The window will close if you press any key while the window has focus.
    Did JAWS read the contents of that window to you?

    So how does this behave for you? Did you get to hear about that output? Did you press a key to close a window which had opened?

    I didn't hear about the output. When I pressed the shortcut to run the program, it first asked me if I wanted to build it, and I said "Yes". Then it launched the Command Prompt. What's up with that, I wonder?



  • @Annabelle
    You wrote:

    Then it launched the Command Prompt.

    It is probably in that Command Prompt window that I would expect the text of Hello World! to have been output. Is that possible?



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    You wrote:

    Then it launched the Command Prompt.

    It is probably in that Command Prompt window that I would expect the text of Hello World! to have been output. Is that possible?

    JAWS doesn't show anything in the Command Prompt. If the text was shown, I'd be able to read it with the left and right arrow keys.



  • @Annabelle
    At this point, wait for somebody helpful to try just what you have in Visual Studio and explain what it is they see about where the output goes.


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    JAWS doesn't show anything in the Command Prompt. If the text was shown, I'd be able to read it with the left and right arrow keys.

    This user (KrolPolski) found that arrow keys don't work in the Command Prompt for JAWS, but another user (Graham87) described a workaround: https://www.reddit.com/r/Blind/comments/8zf1f1/using_a_command_prompt_with_jaws/

    See if you can get JAWS to read something on the Command Prompt before it closes. The Command Prompt should contain the text, "Hello world!"

    If you still have no luck with JAWS, does the Microsoft Narrator work?



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    JAWS doesn't show anything in the Command Prompt. If the text was shown, I'd be able to read it with the left and right arrow keys.

    This user (KrolPolski) found that arrow keys don't work in the Command Prompt for JAWS, but another user (Graham87) described a workaround: https://www.reddit.com/r/Blind/comments/8zf1f1/using_a_command_prompt_with_jaws/

    See if you can get JAWS to read something on the Command Prompt before it closes. The Command Prompt should contain the text, "Hello world!"

    If you still have no luck with JAWS, does the Microsoft Narrator work?

    I ran it again, and in the Command Prompt, I got:
    "Hello World! Press any key to continue..."
    What do I do next?



  • @Annabelle

    What do I do next?

    Well, that's it for "Hello World": you've done it! (And very well done!) You have written a program, compiled it, and run it successfully with the expected output.

    What you do now is up to you :) If you mean you want to turn to Qt you'd have to install it, I don't know what you intended to do.



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle

    What do I do next?

    Well, that's it for "Hello World": you've done it! (And very well done!) You have written a program, compiled it, and run it successfully with the expected output.

    What you do now is up to you :) If you mean you want to turn to Qt you'd have to install it, I don't know what you intended to do.

    I wonder if I could make Qt programs with Visual Studio. Or is that just for C++?



  • @Annabelle
    You can integrate Visual Studio with Qt to develop programs, or you can use Qt Creator as your "IDE" (Integrated Development Environment). I don't know whether previous discussions have indicated a preference for which one for you.



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    You can integrate Visual Studio with Qt to develop programs, or you can use Qt Creator as your "IDE" (Integrated Development Environment). I don't know whether previous discussions have indicated a preference for which one for you.

    I think from what I've experienced so far, Visual Studio is the more accessible one for me. That being said, how would I make Qt programs with Visual Studio?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    JAWS doesn't show anything in the Command Prompt. If the text was shown, I'd be able to read it with the left and right arrow keys.

    This user (KrolPolski) found that arrow keys don't work in the Command Prompt for JAWS, but another user (Graham87) described a workaround: https://www.reddit.com/r/Blind/comments/8zf1f1/using_a_command_prompt_with_jaws/

    See if you can get JAWS to read something on the Command Prompt before it closes. The Command Prompt should contain the text, "Hello world!"

    If you still have no luck with JAWS, does the Microsoft Narrator work?

    I ran it again, and in the Command Prompt, I got:
    "Hello World! Press any key to continue..."

    Great! That means JAWS can read the outputs of your programs.

    What do I do next?

    Do you remember the plan? Your task is to learn the basics of C++ first, without Qt.

    First, try to modify the code to make the Command Prompt say something other than "Hello world!". For example, try to make it say, "Hi Annabelle!"

    After that, continue working through the learncpp.com tutorial.

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I wonder if I could make Qt programs with Visual Studio. Or is that just for C++?

    C++ is a programming language, while Qt is a library for C++. You use the C++ language to write programs with the Qt library.

    This is why learning the basics of C++ is an important step to achieve your goal of making Qt programs.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    JAWS doesn't show anything in the Command Prompt. If the text was shown, I'd be able to read it with the left and right arrow keys.

    This user (KrolPolski) found that arrow keys don't work in the Command Prompt for JAWS, but another user (Graham87) described a workaround: https://www.reddit.com/r/Blind/comments/8zf1f1/using_a_command_prompt_with_jaws/

    See if you can get JAWS to read something on the Command Prompt before it closes. The Command Prompt should contain the text, "Hello world!"

    If you still have no luck with JAWS, does the Microsoft Narrator work?

    I ran it again, and in the Command Prompt, I got:
    "Hello World! Press any key to continue..."

    Great! That means JAWS can read the outputs of your programs.

    What do I do next?

    Do you remember the plan? Your task is to learn the basics of C++ first, without Qt.

    First, try to modify the code to make the Command Prompt say something other than "Hello world!". For example, try to make it say, "Hi Annabelle!"

    After that, continue working through the learncpp.com tutorial.

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I wonder if I could make Qt programs with Visual Studio. Or is that just for C++?

    C++ is a programming language, while Qt is a library for C++. You use the C++ language to write programs with the Qt library.

    This is why learning the basics of C++ is an important step to achieve your goal of making Qt programs.

    Would I put "Hi Annabelle!", in the spot of code where it would usually say "Hello World"? I'm confused!



  • @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Would I put "Hi Annabelle!", in the spot of code where it would usually say "Hello World"? I'm confused!

    Yes indeed! You should not be confused.

    I had not realised you were working through a learn C++ tutorial. That is an excellent idea. Moving onto Qt now would be a huge step --- you have to learn to walk before you can run!

    @JKSH is getting you to just modify some existing, working code to do something slightly different. That happens all the time in programming.

    Get it working with the new message instead of the present one. Then, how about making it output two lines instead of one? After it has said the new Hi Annabelle!, make it say Bye bye now. That is going to require a second std::cout line after the existing one, isn't it? You can either type that in from scratch, or to avoid typing you could copy & paste your existing line and then change the string in the middle of the line. I don't know how easily your interface allows you to copy & paste, it's up to you.


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Would I put "Hi Annabelle!", in the spot of code where it would usually say "Hello World"? I'm confused!

    Be adventurous and give it a try!



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Would I put "Hi Annabelle!", in the spot of code where it would usually say "Hello World"? I'm confused!

    Be adventurous and give it a try!

    I ended up having to make a separate project, as when I put "Hi Annabelle!" and "Bye now." into the original project, it still displayed "Hello World!" in the resulting Command Prompt.


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I ended up having to make a separate project, as when I put "Hi Annabelle!" and "Bye now." into the original project, it still displayed "Hello World!" in the resulting Command Prompt.

    Try to get your updated code to affect what's shown in the Command Prompt without making a separate project. If you are able to do this, you will save yourself lots of time in future exercises or projects.

    After you edit the code in your original project, remember to save your changes, then rebuild and re-run your program.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I ended up having to make a separate project, as when I put "Hi Annabelle!" and "Bye now." into the original project, it still displayed "Hello World!" in the resulting Command Prompt.

    Try to get your updated code to affect what's shown in the Command Prompt without making a separate project. If you are able to do this, you will save yourself lots of time in future exercises or projects.

    After you edit the code in your original project, remember to save your changes, then rebuild and re-run your program.

    That's what I did originally, and unfortunately the resulting text in the command prompt didn't change, it still said "Hello World!".


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Try to get your updated code to affect what's shown in the Command Prompt without making a separate project. If you are able to do this, you will save yourself lots of time in future exercises or projects.

    After you edit the code in your original project, remember to save your changes, then rebuild and re-run your program.

    That's what I did originally, and unfortunately the resulting text in the command prompt didn't change, it still said "Hello World!".

    To clarify: Did you close the original Command Prompt window before editing, saving, rebuilding, and rerunning your program?



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Try to get your updated code to affect what's shown in the Command Prompt without making a separate project. If you are able to do this, you will save yourself lots of time in future exercises or projects.

    After you edit the code in your original project, remember to save your changes, then rebuild and re-run your program.

    That's what I did originally, and unfortunately the resulting text in the command prompt didn't change, it still said "Hello World!".

    To clarify: Did you close the original Command Prompt window before editing, saving, rebuilding, and rerunning your program?

    Yes.


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Try to get your updated code to affect what's shown in the Command Prompt without making a separate project. If you are able to do this, you will save yourself lots of time in future exercises or projects.

    After you edit the code in your original project, remember to save your changes, then rebuild and re-run your program.

    That's what I did originally, and unfortunately the resulting text in the command prompt didn't change, it still said "Hello World!".

    To clarify: Did you close the original Command Prompt window before editing, saving, rebuilding, and rerunning your program?

    Yes.

    Hmm, that is strange. However, without access to your PC, it's hard to tell what's wrong.

    In any case, don't let yourself be hindered by little issues like this. Be proactive, and keep working your way through the tutorials.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Try to get your updated code to affect what's shown in the Command Prompt without making a separate project. If you are able to do this, you will save yourself lots of time in future exercises or projects.

    After you edit the code in your original project, remember to save your changes, then rebuild and re-run your program.

    That's what I did originally, and unfortunately the resulting text in the command prompt didn't change, it still said "Hello World!".

    To clarify: Did you close the original Command Prompt window before editing, saving, rebuilding, and rerunning your program?

    Yes.

    Hmm, that is strange. However, without access to your PC, it's hard to tell what's wrong.

    In any case, don't let yourself be hindered by little issues like this. Be proactive, and keep working your way through the tutorials.

    I have Teamviewer, if you'd like to access it that way. Would you want my phone number for that method?



  • @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I ended up having to make a separate project, as when I put "Hi Annabelle!" and "Bye now." into the original project, it still displayed "Hello World!" in the resulting Command Prompt.

    Annabelle, if you think about this logically that cannot be the right approach. You don't/must not have to create a new project in order to alter something like the output from a piece of code you have already written.

    Why don't you go back now to the original project and have a stab at making the edits again? If that still produces the wrong output as you said, paste the code and we'll have a look at it.



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I ended up having to make a separate project, as when I put "Hi Annabelle!" and "Bye now." into the original project, it still displayed "Hello World!" in the resulting Command Prompt.

    Annabelle, if you think about this logically that cannot be the right approach. You don't/must not have to create a new project in order to alter something like the output from a piece of code you have already written.

    Why don't you go back now to the original project and have a stab at making the edits again? If that still produces the wrong output as you said, paste the code and we'll have a look at it.

    @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I ended up having to make a separate project, as when I put "Hi Annabelle!" and "Bye now." into the original project, it still displayed "Hello World!" in the resulting Command Prompt.

    Annabelle, if you think about this logically that cannot be the right approach. You don't/must not have to create a new project in order to alter something like the output from a piece of code you have already written.

    Why don't you go back now to the original project and have a stab at making the edits again? If that still produces the wrong output as you said, paste the code and we'll have a look at it.

    Now my copy of Visual Studio has this message upon opening. "Your evaluation period has ended. Please sign in to your account to unlock the product." This seems rather strange, since I believe that Visual Studio Community is free. What do I do next?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Would you want my phone number for that method?

    For your own security, please don't post your phone number or home address publicly.

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Now my copy of Visual Studio has this message upon opening. "Your evaluation period has ended. Please sign in to your account to unlock the product." This seems rather strange, since I believe that Visual Studio Community is free. What do I do next?

    Have a closer look at the message. It says "Please sign in to your account" (which tells you what to do next); it doesn't ask for payment.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Would you want my phone number for that method?

    For your own security, please don't post your phone number or home address publicly.

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Now my copy of Visual Studio has this message upon opening. "Your evaluation period has ended. Please sign in to your account to unlock the product." This seems rather strange, since I believe that Visual Studio Community is free. What do I do next?

    Have a closer look at the message. It says "Please sign in to your account" (which tells you what to do next); it doesn't ask for payment.

    I've tried signing in, but now my account has been temporarily suspended, even though I'm the only one who has signed into this account. When I said that I forgot my password, that somehow led to my account being suspended. What do I do now?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    When I said that I forgot my password, that somehow led to my account being suspended.

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/13956/microsoft-account-temporarily-suspended



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    When I said that I forgot my password, that somehow led to my account being suspended.

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/13956/microsoft-account-temporarily-suspended

    On that link, it says in Step 2: Enter a phone number to request a security code be sent to you via text message. This can be any phone that can receive text messages.

    Trouble is, I don't have a phone that does texting, just a regular landline phone.


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Trouble is, I don't have a phone that does texting, just a regular landline phone.

    Microsoft says, "The phone number you use to receive this text message doesn't need to be associated with your account. It doesn't even need to be your own phone number. If your phone doesn't receive text messages, ask a friend or family member if you can use theirs."

    Do you have any family/friends you can trust with this?


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