Planned maintenance has been done but it did not solve the problem. So work will continue on this and a new time for trying updates will be announced asap.

Qt Programming Language



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Now that I've got Visual Studio Community 2015 installed, what do I do next?

    Great! Just to double-check: During installation, did you select the option for C++ development?

    Your next step is to start making your way through the tutorials, starting from Chapter 0. Sections 0.1 to 0.5 provide introductory knowledge; section 0.6 "Installing an Integrated Development Environment" talks about installing Visual Studio (which you have already done); section 0.7 "Compiling your first program" is where the really important stuff begins. Make sure you follow the instructions carefully!

    It didn't give me that option in the initial installation. I had to run it again and press Enter on the "Modify" button, and then check the checkboxes next to the appropriate options for programming language components. The one I couldn't find was "C++ Development". I did, however, find "Visual C++". Is that the one you mean? Also, it installed, in addition to Visual Studio 2015, two programs with which I'm not familiar. Microsoft Silverlight, and Microsoft Expression. What do these programs do? Are they necessary components for running Visual Studio Community? If not, is there a way to safely uninstall them without taking away from Visual Studio Community? Also, this new installation has caused my machine to take a little more time between the Windows Logon screen and JAWS starting up. What's up with that, I wonder?


  • Moderators

    Sorry for the late reply.

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    It didn't give me that option in the initial installation. I had to run it again and press Enter on the "Modify" button, and then check the checkboxes next to the appropriate options for programming language components. The one I couldn't find was "C++ Development". I did, however, find "Visual C++". Is that the one you mean?

    Yes, that's the one I meant. Install "Visual C++" so that you can build C++ programs.

    Also, it installed, in addition to Visual Studio 2015, two programs with which I'm not familiar. Microsoft Silverlight, and Microsoft Expression. What do these programs do? Are they necessary components for running Visual Studio Community?

    Microsoft Silverlight is a technology to create rich interactive websites, similar to Adobe Flash. However, both Silverlight and Flash have fallen out of favour these days.

    Microsoft Expression is a program to edit HTML documents.

    Neither component is necessary to run Visual Studio Community.

    If not, is there a way to safely uninstall them without taking away from Visual Studio Community?

    If you click the "Modify" button again, are you able to uncheck the checkboxes for Silverlight and Expression?

    Also, this new installation has caused my machine to take a little more time between the Windows Logon screen and JAWS starting up. What's up with that, I wonder?

    I'm not sure. None of the Visual Studio components run at startup so they shouldn't have any impact on startup time.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    Sorry for the late reply.

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    It didn't give me that option in the initial installation. I had to run it again and press Enter on the "Modify" button, and then check the checkboxes next to the appropriate options for programming language components. The one I couldn't find was "C++ Development". I did, however, find "Visual C++". Is that the one you mean?

    Yes, that's the one I meant. Install "Visual C++" so that you can build C++ programs.

    Also, it installed, in addition to Visual Studio 2015, two programs with which I'm not familiar. Microsoft Silverlight, and Microsoft Expression. What do these programs do? Are they necessary components for running Visual Studio Community?

    Microsoft Silverlight is a technology to create rich interactive websites, similar to Adobe Flash. However, both Silverlight and Flash have fallen out of favour these days.

    Microsoft Expression is a program to edit HTML documents.

    Neither component is necessary to run Visual Studio Community.

    If not, is there a way to safely uninstall them without taking away from Visual Studio Community?

    If you click the "Modify" button again, are you able to uncheck the checkboxes for Silverlight and Expression?

    Also, this new installation has caused my machine to take a little more time between the Windows Logon screen and JAWS starting up. What's up with that, I wonder?

    I'm not sure. None of the Visual Studio components run at startup so they shouldn't have any impact on startup time.

    Now that I've installed the Visual C++ programming language component, what do I do next?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Now that I've installed the Visual C++ programming language component, what do I do next?

    The next thing to do is to follow the tutorial and learn C++.

    Just to double-check: Are you willing to spend time and effort to learn programming? It will take you at least a few weeks to learn the basics of C++. After that, it will take you at least a few months to learn the various features you need and to produce the program that you've been describing.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Now that I've installed the Visual C++ programming language component, what do I do next?

    The next thing to do is to follow the tutorial and learn C++.

    Just to double-check: Are you willing to spend time and effort to learn programming? It will take you at least a few weeks to learn the basics of C++. After that, it will take you at least a few months to learn the various features you need and to produce the program that you've been describing.

    You ask if I'm willing to spend time and effort learning programming? The answer to that is a resounding "Yes!" I'm willing to learn anything, as long as I can take it one step at a time, and as long as there aren't too many graphics for my screenreader to have to jump over. So a few weeks to learn the basics, and a few months to learn the concepts you mention as far as "if" statements, variables, and string manipulation goes?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    You ask if I'm willing to spend time and effort learning programming? The answer to that is a resounding "Yes!" I'm willing to learn anything, as long as I can take it one step at a time, and as long as there aren't too many graphics for my screenreader to have to jump over. So a few weeks to learn the basics, and a few months to learn the concepts you mention as far as "if" statements, variables, and string manipulation goes?

    That's great! It is refreshing to see your enthusiasm for learning.

    Concepts like variables and "if" statements are part of basic C++, so I think you should cover those within a few weeks. I would say string manipulation is intermediate-level. Let me know when you've finished learning the basics, and I'll be happy to teach you more about string manipulation.

    GUIs, accessibility features, and building the applications are much more advanced -- these will take you a few months (at least) to understand.

    Anyway, all the best with learning C++ through learncpp.com. As I mentioned before, work through all of chapter 0, all of chapter 1, section 2.1, and section 2.6. After that, search for the concepts I mentioned.

    Feel free to ask here if something is unclear in the tutorial.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    You ask if I'm willing to spend time and effort learning programming? The answer to that is a resounding "Yes!" I'm willing to learn anything, as long as I can take it one step at a time, and as long as there aren't too many graphics for my screenreader to have to jump over. So a few weeks to learn the basics, and a few months to learn the concepts you mention as far as "if" statements, variables, and string manipulation goes?

    That's great! It is refreshing to see your enthusiasm for learning.

    Concepts like variables and "if" statements are part of basic C++, so I think you should cover those within a few weeks. I would say string manipulation is intermediate-level. Let me know when you've finished learning the basics, and I'll be happy to teach you more about string manipulation.

    GUIs, accessibility features, and building the applications are much more advanced -- these will take you a few months (at least) to understand.

    Anyway, all the best with learning C++ through learncpp.com. As I mentioned before, work through all of chapter 0, all of chapter 1, section 2.1, and section 2.6. After that, search for the concepts I mentioned.

    Feel free to ask here if something is unclear in the tutorial.

    I tried compiling a Qt version of "Hello World" in Visual Studio, but it said there were a bunch of errors, despite the fact that I copied and pasted the code into a text document from the Qt Documentation. Then I pasted that code into Visual Studio's "Text Editor". On http://www.learncpp.com, there's a different way of printing the "Hello World" project, where the code has something called "cout", which I don't understand. What's the difference between these two codes? That is, the Qt code of "Hello World", and the C++ code of "Hello World"? I'm confused on this one!


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I tried compiling a Qt version of "Hello World" in Visual Studio, but it said there were a bunch of errors, despite the fact that I copied and pasted the code into a text document from the Qt Documentation.

    Before you can use Qt in Visual Studio, you need to perform some additional setup. For now, let's skip all this complexity. Just follow the tutorial without using Qt for now.

    Then I pasted that code into Visual Studio's "Text Editor". On http://www.learncpp.com, there's a different way of printing the "Hello World" project, where the code has something called "cout", which I don't understand. What's the difference between these two codes? That is, the Qt code of "Hello World", and the C++ code of "Hello World"? I'm confused on this one!

    A "Hello World" program is just a very simple program to help programmers to start using a new language or library. These are not unique; there are many variants of C++ "Hello Worlds" and many variants of Qt "Hello Worlds".

    • A C++ "Hello World" program introduces the programmer to the C++ language.
    • A Qt "Hello World" program introduces the programmer to the Qt library.

    cout stands for "character output". It is a place where your program can display some text.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I tried compiling a Qt version of "Hello World" in Visual Studio, but it said there were a bunch of errors, despite the fact that I copied and pasted the code into a text document from the Qt Documentation.

    Before you can use Qt in Visual Studio, you need to perform some additional setup. For now, let's skip all this complexity. Just follow the tutorial without using Qt for now.

    Then I pasted that code into Visual Studio's "Text Editor". On http://www.learncpp.com, there's a different way of printing the "Hello World" project, where the code has something called "cout", which I don't understand. What's the difference between these two codes? That is, the Qt code of "Hello World", and the C++ code of "Hello World"? I'm confused on this one!

    A "Hello World" program is just a very simple program to help programmers to start using a new language or library. These are not unique; there are many variants of C++ "Hello Worlds" and many variants of Qt "Hello Worlds".

    • A C++ "Hello World" program introduces the programmer to the C++ language.
    • A Qt "Hello World" program introduces the programmer to the Qt library.

    cout stands for "character output". It is a place where your program can display some text.

    If I lose focus with the text editor in Visual Studio while performing the examples in the tutorial, is there a keyboard shortcut for me to put it in focus again?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    If I lose focus with the text editor in Visual Studio while performing the examples in the tutorial, is there a keyboard shortcut for me to put it in focus again?

    Could you please describe what you were doing up to the moment where focus is lost?



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    If I lose focus with the text editor in Visual Studio while performing the examples in the tutorial, is there a keyboard shortcut for me to put it in focus again?

    Could you please describe what you were doing up to the moment where focus is lost?

    I created a new project, which took me to the editor where there was some example text, then I deleted what was there. Next, I went to the tutorial where the "Hello World" code was, and I copied the code to the clipboard. When I pressed Alt+Tab to return to the text editor in Visual Studio to paste the newly-copied code, my screenreader didn't show it (the text editor), just a blank screen.


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I created a new project, which took me to the editor where there was some example text, then I deleted what was there. Next, I went to the tutorial where the "Hello World" code was, and I copied the code to the clipboard. When I pressed Alt+Tab to return to the text editor in Visual Studio to paste the newly-copied code, my screenreader didn't show it (the text editor), just a blank screen.

    Could it be that the screenreader was silent because there was no text inside the editor? What happens when you try to paste the newly-copied code?

    Also, try using Ctrl+Tab to cycle between sub-windows inside Visual Studio.

    One final word of advise: Please don't wait for me (or anyone else) to reply before you take action. Take the initiative to try different things (and search on Google) to see if you can solve the problem before someone replies.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I created a new project, which took me to the editor where there was some example text, then I deleted what was there. Next, I went to the tutorial where the "Hello World" code was, and I copied the code to the clipboard. When I pressed Alt+Tab to return to the text editor in Visual Studio to paste the newly-copied code, my screenreader didn't show it (the text editor), just a blank screen.

    Could it be that the screenreader was silent because there was no text inside the editor? What happens when you try to paste the newly-copied code?

    Also, try using Ctrl+Tab to cycle between sub-windows inside Visual Studio.

    One final word of advise: Please don't wait for me (or anyone else) to reply before you take action. Take the initiative to try different things (and search on Google) to see if you can solve the problem before someone replies.

    I'm not sure why this didn't work, but I pasted the Hello World code in the text editor window, then when building the project, there were some errors. Even though I pasted the code without any changes.
    0_1540994545531_8d93dc3f-313e-41be-a836-59bb363386f9-image.png



  • @Annabelle
    [EDIT: I have scrapped my suggestions here, read @mrjj's post below. He is right because of the error message number. You are using a .cs file extension and compiling your code as C# instead of C++ in Visual Studio. Change your filename extension to .cpp. You need to create a completely different kind of project in Visual Studio, it must be something like a "C++ project" and not a "CSharp project".]


  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    Hi
    Im wondering about the file extension.
    Its .cs which would indicate a c sharp program
    and not a c++ one ?
    Maybe a wrong template was used to create it ?


  • Moderators

    @mrjj said in Qt Programming Language:

    Hi
    Im wondering about the file extension.
    Its .cs which would indicate a c sharp program
    and not a c++ one ?
    Maybe a wrong template was used to create it ?

    @mrjj is right; you have created a C# project instead of a C++ project. When you create a project, select "Visual C++".

    I can't remember what Visual Studio 2015 is like, but Visual Studio 2017 lets me choose Visual C++ > Windows Desktop > Windows Console Application.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @mrjj said in Qt Programming Language:

    Hi
    Im wondering about the file extension.
    Its .cs which would indicate a c sharp program
    and not a c++ one ?
    Maybe a wrong template was used to create it ?

    @mrjj is right; you have created a C# project instead of a C++ project. When you create a project, select "Visual C++".

    I can't remember what Visual Studio 2015 is like, but Visual Studio 2017 lets me choose Visual C++ > Windows Desktop > Windows Console Application.

    Here's another screenshot. This time, I actually created a C++ project, but it still says there's an error. 0_1541007381736_537203d4-62e9-49e1-9e39-5c7e079ba05e-image.png



  • @Annabelle
    This is to do with the VS/MS compiler. Paste the following line:

    #include "stdafx.h"
    

    into your file, as the first line, somewhere above your existing #include <iostream>.

    Alternatively you can remove a compiler switch (/Yu) in your VS project, but I think the above is easiest.



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    This is to do with the VS/MS compiler. Paste the following line:

    #include "stdafx.h"
    

    into your file, as the first line, somewhere above your existing #include <iostream>.

    Alternatively you remover a compiler switch (/Yu) in your VS project, but I think the above is easiest.

    What exactly is "stdafx"? Is it an initializing parameter?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    What exactly is "stdafx"? Is it an initializing parameter?

    You can find an answer by searching on Google or another search engine. Programmers must use search engines often, so make it a habit.

    Here is an answer: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/2976035/purpose-of-stdafx-h



  • I don't know what I did wrong this time, but here's another screenshot of an error.
    0_1541225135389_7d1ba768-18a7-4ec3-b4aa-26271bc951dc-image.png



  • @Annabelle
    When you did the paste, this time you have accidentally actually copied the actual line numbers 1 to 6 onto lines 1 to 6. This is in addition to the line numbers which VS shows to the left of every line you write, and your screenreader probably reads out to you. Which means that prior to your #include at line 7 the first 6 lines are unacceptable. You need to delete, or change to blank lines, your first 6 lines.

    When you try to compile code, the very first error is highly significant. Once the compiler hits something erroneous, very often it does not do a great a job at "recovering" from the error such that it gives sensible errors (or not) for whatever follows. So you can end up with loads of "spurious" errors after the first one. Concentrate each time on fixing whatever the very first error reported is, then try compiling again and see where it gets you.

    Now, there is an important thing here in VS which I do not know whether you are aware of/your screenreader tells you about. When we look at the lines you have shown us in the screenshot above, we see the lines the compiler does not like having a "squiggly red underline" shown. For us we can immediately see those and know something is wrong. Does your screenreader tell you about these? In your current code, the very first line (numbered 1) has the actual text of the number 1 on it. Since that is wrong, VS squiggle-red-underlines that 1. It would be very helpful to you if your screenreader can make you aware of such lines, but perhaps it cannot? Also, I believe that if I hovered my mouse over a red-squiggle-underline VS would put up a "tooltip" giving me the error message for what is wrong: again, are you able to be informed about that?



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    When you did the paste, this time you have accidentally actually copied the actual line numbers 1 to 6 onto lines 1 to 6. This is in addition to the line numbers which VS shows to the left of every line you write, and your screenreader probably reads out to you. Which means that prior to your #include at line 7 the first 6 lines are unacceptable. You need to delete, or change to blank lines, your first 6 lines.

    When you try to compile code, the very first error is highly significant. Once the compiler hits something erroneous, very often it does not do a great a job at "recovering" from the error such that it gives sensible errors (or not) for whatever follows. So you can end up with loads of "spurious" errors after the first one. Concentrate each time on fixing whatever the very first error reported is, then try compiling again and see where it gets you.

    Now, there is an important thing here in VS which I do not know whether you are aware of/your screenreader tells you about. When we look at the lines you have shown us in the screenshot above, we see the lines the compiler does not like having a "squiggly red underline" shown. For us we can immediately see those and know something is wrong. Does your screenreader tell you about these? In your current code, the very first line (numbered 1) has the actual text of the number 1 on it. Since that is wrong, VS squiggle-red-underlines that 1. It would be very helpful to you if your screenreader can make you aware of such lines, but perhaps it cannot? Also, I believe that if I hovered my mouse over a red-squiggle-underline VS would put up a "tooltip" giving me the error message for what is wrong: again, are you able to be informed about that?

    My screenreader can't tell if an underline has a color or is squigly. It can say _ (underline). Is that the mark you're talking about? I'm confused!



  • Here's a screenshot of yet another error. I'm not sure what I did wrong. I deleted the lines with pasted numbers, but even Visual Studio didn't like something I did then.
    0_1541260099015_7152e5c5-4f99-4b63-ab56-23a1c4260150-image.png


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    My screenreader can't tell if an underline has a color or is squigly. It can say _ (underline). Is that the mark you're talking about?

    In your latest screenshot, there was a red squiggly line underneath "#include". Did your screenreader announce that? If not, don't worry -- the error is repeated under the Error List pane: "cannot open source Hello World! file "stdafx.h". Did your screenreader announce that?

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Here's a screenshot of yet another error.

    Change <stdafx.h> to "stdafx.h". In other words, change the angular brackets to double quotation marks.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    My screenreader can't tell if an underline has a color or is squigly. It can say _ (underline). Is that the mark you're talking about?

    In your latest screenshot, there was a red squiggly line underneath "#include". Did your screenreader announce that? If not, don't worry -- the error is repeated under the Error List pane: "cannot open source Hello World! file "stdafx.h". Did your screenreader announce that?

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Here's a screenshot of yet another error.

    Change <stdafx.h> to "stdafx.h". In other words, change the angular brackets to double quotation marks.

    It seems that when I type #include "stdafx.h", the quotation marks, for some reason, are automatically changed to angular brackets (<>). How do I prevent that from happening?



  • How's this?

    0_1541379728064_097a0365-c849-4c61-a942-b48351b6e910-image.png



  • @Annabelle
    This looks fault-free, and seems to have run without error! I don't know where the "Hello world" output went though? On that Output tab you have the Show output from combobox set to Debug, you may have to set that to something else to see/hear the program output?



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    This looks fault-free, and seems to have run without error! I don't know where the "Hello world" output went though? On that Output tab you have the Show output from combobox set to Debug, you may have to set that to something else to see/hear the program output?

    How do I do that, I wonder? After I make the "Hello World" program, what do I do next?



  • @Annabelle
    Ignore my comment about the Debug tab, I think. The question is: when you run the program, it should output Hello world!, where does that output go to? Does it maybe open a console window, send it there, and then close it as soon as your program finishes, all of which would be near "instantaneous"? It may depend on your project type, I don't know. You may need hep on this from VS C++ people here....


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    I don't know where the "Hello world" output went though? On that Output tab you have the Show output from combobox set to Debug, you may have to set that to something else to see/hear the program output?

    How do I do that, I wonder?

    When you run your program (Ctrl + F5), a window should pop up and that window should contain the words "Hello world!". The window will close if you press any key while the window has focus.

    Did JAWS read the contents of that window to you?



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    Ignore my comment about the Debug tab, I think. The question is: when you run the program, it should output Hello world!, where does that output go to? Does it maybe open a console window, send it there, and then close it as soon as your program finishes, all of which would be near "instantaneous"? It may depend on your project type, I don't know. You may need hep on this from VS C++ people here....

    This is what the output window looks like in a screenshot. 0_1541609206448_6d656a50-ae21-4c35-b9e3-89f42a2c7ce5-image.png
    What is the meaning of this message?
    "The program '[2880] Hello World!.exe' has exited with code 0 (0x0)."



  • @Annabelle

    "The program '[2880] Hello World!.exe' has exited with code 0 (0x0)."

    It's just Visual Studio letting you know good news! It's telling you that you just ran your program executable (Hello World!.exe), it ran to completion and exited, and it returned an "exit code" of 0 (which is good, is what your code does, but which you don't care about).

    My question still remains, however. When that program ran it sent the string Hello World! to its "output" (that's the purpose of this program). Where did that "output" go? (I don't use Visual Studio, and with your project type, so I don't know. @JKSH said earlier:

    When you run your program (Ctrl + F5), a window should pop up and that window should contain the words "Hello world!". The window will close if you press any key while the window has focus.
    Did JAWS read the contents of that window to you?

    So how does this behave for you? Did you get to hear about that output? Did you press a key to close a window which had opened?



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle

    "The program '[2880] Hello World!.exe' has exited with code 0 (0x0)."

    It's just Visual Studio letting you know good news! It's telling you that you just ran your program executable (Hello World!.exe), it ran to completion and exited, and it returned an "exit code" of 0 (which is good, is what your code does, but which you don't care about).

    My question still remains, however. When that program ran it sent the string Hello World! to its "output" (that's the purpose of this program). Where did that "output" go? (I don't use Visual Studio, and with your project type, so I don't know. @JKSH said earlier:

    When you run your program (Ctrl + F5), a window should pop up and that window should contain the words "Hello world!". The window will close if you press any key while the window has focus.
    Did JAWS read the contents of that window to you?

    So how does this behave for you? Did you get to hear about that output? Did you press a key to close a window which had opened?

    @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle

    "The program '[2880] Hello World!.exe' has exited with code 0 (0x0)."

    It's just Visual Studio letting you know good news! It's telling you that you just ran your program executable (Hello World!.exe), it ran to completion and exited, and it returned an "exit code" of 0 (which is good, is what your code does, but which you don't care about).

    My question still remains, however. When that program ran it sent the string Hello World! to its "output" (that's the purpose of this program). Where did that "output" go? (I don't use Visual Studio, and with your project type, so I don't know. @JKSH said earlier:

    When you run your program (Ctrl + F5), a window should pop up and that window should contain the words "Hello world!". The window will close if you press any key while the window has focus.
    Did JAWS read the contents of that window to you?

    So how does this behave for you? Did you get to hear about that output? Did you press a key to close a window which had opened?

    @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle

    "The program '[2880] Hello World!.exe' has exited with code 0 (0x0)."

    It's just Visual Studio letting you know good news! It's telling you that you just ran your program executable (Hello World!.exe), it ran to completion and exited, and it returned an "exit code" of 0 (which is good, is what your code does, but which you don't care about).

    My question still remains, however. When that program ran it sent the string Hello World! to its "output" (that's the purpose of this program). Where did that "output" go? (I don't use Visual Studio, and with your project type, so I don't know. @JKSH said earlier:

    When you run your program (Ctrl + F5), a window should pop up and that window should contain the words "Hello world!". The window will close if you press any key while the window has focus.
    Did JAWS read the contents of that window to you?

    So how does this behave for you? Did you get to hear about that output? Did you press a key to close a window which had opened?

    I didn't hear about the output. When I pressed the shortcut to run the program, it first asked me if I wanted to build it, and I said "Yes". Then it launched the Command Prompt. What's up with that, I wonder?



  • @Annabelle
    You wrote:

    Then it launched the Command Prompt.

    It is probably in that Command Prompt window that I would expect the text of Hello World! to have been output. Is that possible?



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    You wrote:

    Then it launched the Command Prompt.

    It is probably in that Command Prompt window that I would expect the text of Hello World! to have been output. Is that possible?

    JAWS doesn't show anything in the Command Prompt. If the text was shown, I'd be able to read it with the left and right arrow keys.



  • @Annabelle
    At this point, wait for somebody helpful to try just what you have in Visual Studio and explain what it is they see about where the output goes.


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    JAWS doesn't show anything in the Command Prompt. If the text was shown, I'd be able to read it with the left and right arrow keys.

    This user (KrolPolski) found that arrow keys don't work in the Command Prompt for JAWS, but another user (Graham87) described a workaround: https://www.reddit.com/r/Blind/comments/8zf1f1/using_a_command_prompt_with_jaws/

    See if you can get JAWS to read something on the Command Prompt before it closes. The Command Prompt should contain the text, "Hello world!"

    If you still have no luck with JAWS, does the Microsoft Narrator work?



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    JAWS doesn't show anything in the Command Prompt. If the text was shown, I'd be able to read it with the left and right arrow keys.

    This user (KrolPolski) found that arrow keys don't work in the Command Prompt for JAWS, but another user (Graham87) described a workaround: https://www.reddit.com/r/Blind/comments/8zf1f1/using_a_command_prompt_with_jaws/

    See if you can get JAWS to read something on the Command Prompt before it closes. The Command Prompt should contain the text, "Hello world!"

    If you still have no luck with JAWS, does the Microsoft Narrator work?

    I ran it again, and in the Command Prompt, I got:
    "Hello World! Press any key to continue..."
    What do I do next?



  • @Annabelle

    What do I do next?

    Well, that's it for "Hello World": you've done it! (And very well done!) You have written a program, compiled it, and run it successfully with the expected output.

    What you do now is up to you :) If you mean you want to turn to Qt you'd have to install it, I don't know what you intended to do.


Log in to reply