Hey you want to hear a start up joke ? What do you think?



  • I been watching Qt for a while, from a distance.. mostly from google. All the developers I know locally don't use it. I am searching job boards in my local area with no mention Qt at all.

    Well I bought into the Commercial Edition of Qt called the Startup. I went ahead and paid a year in advance so I could cash in on the $49 per month if I paid a year in advance. I went ahead and took action and paid the $588 something.. I thought this was still high but it was manageable.

    I have bought classes, went out and bought a couple of Qt Books and even started porting over my commercial product from C# to Qt C++.

    Now many months into my subscription I found out that my second year is going to be full price. I did not lock in nothing by taking action but a full priced subscription waiting for me.

    I bought because I was under the impression that the commercial edition had more to offer than the free edition.. but I see now the commercial modules have been made public to everyone. So why am I paying again?

    I put in a help desk ticket and was assigned a case manager that said he would work something out but I needed to wait a week to contact him. After a week went by with out an answer I emailed him again where he said . Your Subscription does not end until March 2017 and he was pretty confident that he could get me the $79 a month price.

    Is there something I am missing here?

    At this point I am just ready to cancel my subscription and uninstall Qt Commercial and load up the free edition.

    I have one product, I am a single developer who wants to develop a commercial product. In my niche the product is given away for free unless the user upgrades.. I thought the $49 a month subscription was hard to swallow.. $79 looks like a horse pill especially with no support.

    What keeps you into commercial edition ?

    *** EDIT** I just found the full price is $350 a month.... wow!

    Why?



  • @EatonCode said in Hey you want to hear a start up joke ? What do you think?:

    but I see now the commercial modules have been made public to everyone. So why am I paying again?

    Not really. most of the old commercial modules have been released to the open source version only as GPL license so you cannot use them in a commercial product. You need I license in that case


  • Moderators

    @EatonCode Hi! Well, you need money to develop your product and The Qt Company needs money to develop its product.


  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    Hi,

    Is it this plan ?



  • @Wieland - I was wondering when some moderator will tell me their wisdom why it's justified. I just feel a little bait and switched. I started out at $49 a month when you pay by the year, now it's $79 a month when you pay by the year.. its $99 a month if you just do the monthly thing.. just wondering when it's going to be more.. Just trying to gauge if it's it's something I wanted to continue.. Or bail out now and just use the free version like 99.7 % of all other developers are doing. It's something you never own... if you stop paying you have to stop using. At least with Visual Studio your not paying for this never ending rat race..

    I am debating building my project on the free stuff then only pay the months I want to build. I probably will not make any changes to the Qt Core files anyway.. Just looking at my options and how I can get started using Qt without having to apply for a loan when the yearly subscription is due.



  • @SGaist - Yes it's this plan. I know I should be grateful it's not more than $79 when paying by the year.. or $99 a month. I have read several books about the past history and how well it's suppose to be. But just trying to get my foot in the door and do the right thing is hard. $1000 per year is about 6 weeks of paychecks.

    Honestly I wanted to hear from developers who are currently using it.. Not from Moderators or people who run the forum.... I wanted to know from real people using the program if it's worth it to them. I have not heard or know of one person who is also using the commercial version.. so I feel kinda stupid for paying for it.


  • Moderators

    @EatonCode I don't work for The Qt Company, so this is my personal opinion: The main purpose of having a commercial license is access to professional support and not being bound to the LGPL / GPL. If your business is so small that you can barely afford a professional license and you can't really benefit from professional support then use the free software license. In this case it would be nice if you could somehow give back something to the free software community, although this is of course in no way mandatory.



  • @Wieland - it's my understanding that $79/$99 is without support. The normal version is is $350 a month according to my case manager that provides support. Just starting out I probably will not be of any use helping with the project. I don't mind paying a fee but I wish it was a bit cheaper so I don't feel cheated each month. $49 was a little high but I thought it was fair. According to my case manager it was shortly abolished after it's release.

    I am actually scared that I might actually love the Qt Commercial Version but not be able to afford it.


  • Moderators

    @EatonCode In my understanding, the start-up plan was created to get some money from the growing number of mobile platform app developers. But this didn't really work, because 1) those very small businesses don't make enough money to actually pay for professional support and 2) they don't need a proprietary license (LGPL is good enough). The traditional target for the commercial license is bigger companies; and for those a few hundred Euros per developer and month is negligible.



  • @Wieland - Just reviewed the email that I got back in March https://blog.qt.io/blog/2016/03/08/qt-start-ups-awesome/ when I bought this I guess I got blind sided and tunnel vision on the $49 per month. Now that I go back and see this.. it's clearly marked $79 after the first year in several places.. I guess I was just to excited. I guess I should be happy to get the first year for $49 per month.



  • @SGaist
    I hope they will make it free for startups in near future.



  • @ansifpi - I honestly doubt it. To many bigger companies would wine about it. Besides that's why the free version is for. Right now it's either you pay or ship your product where any C++ dissembler can view/edit your program unless it's statically linked.


  • Moderators

    Hi @EatonCode,

    @EatonCode said in Hey you want to hear a start up joke ? What do you think?:

    According to my case manager it was shortly abolished after it's release.

    It was an early-bird offer, available from the launch date until 19 May 2016: https://blog.qt.io/blog/2016/05/10/qt-for-start-ups-get-it-cheap-while-you-still-can/

    I am actually scared that I might actually love the Qt Commercial Version but not be able to afford it.

    I suggest you play around with the open source version of Qt first, to familiarize yourself with it and see if it suits your project(s). I'd imagine that porting your C# project would be a helpful learning experience.

    If Qt doesn't suit you, then stick to your original tools.

    If Qt does suit you, ask yourself: Are you able and willing to comply with the open source licenses for your business project(s)? If so, then simply use the free version of Qt. If not (e.g. if you want to use Qt Charts and still keep your app closed-source), then subscribe to the commercial license if it makes business sense.

    See https://blog.qt.io/blog/2016/01/13/new-agreement-with-the-kde-free-qt-foundation/ for a list of modules that are not available under LGPL (scroll down to the "Unified Product Offering" section)

    ==============
    Keep in mind also that there are 3rd-party offerings out there too, such as Qwt which provides LGPL-friendly graphing widgets so you might not need to depend on the GPL-and-commercial-only modules.

    Personally, I've been using the open source version of Qt from the outset -- mainly for hobby projects, but also a few small commercial apps (using LGPL modules). I haven't used the GPL-and-commercial-only modules in any serious projects yet, so I haven't needed the commercial license yet.


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