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Qt usage in thesis



  • Hello,

    I am using Qt in my thesis to program a small application which reads out bluetooth multimeters.
    Both the executable and the code will be put on an flash drive and are available to the reader.

    I am finishing my documentation, however I am not quite sure what licence-files/disclaimers/whatever I have to include...
    I've tried to read some explanation on LGPL but I would appreciate some help of you, explaining what I have to do next.

    I don't want any exclusive rights, the reader may use and modify my code as he pleases, I just want to fulfill the obligations of Qt.

    Thank you very much.
    Unzu



  • @unzu This is a Qt users forum, for license questions you have to contact the Qt Company: for example with this form https://www.qt.io/contact-us/other


  • Moderators

    Hi, congratulations on nearing the completion of your thesis!

    @unzu said in Qt usage in thesis:

    I am not quite sure what licence-files/disclaimers/whatever I have to include...
    I've tried to read some explanation on LGPL but I would appreciate some help of you, explaining what I have to do next.

    I don't want any exclusive rights, the reader may use and modify my code as he pleases, I just want to fulfill the obligations of Qt.

    So you have used Qt under the LGPLv3 license, and you want to publish your application under an open-source license too?

    The important parts are:

    • In your documentation (and perhaps in an "About" dialog of your application), clearly acknowledge that you have used Qt under the LGPLv3. Include the version number of Qt.
    • Provide a way for your readers to obtain a copy of Qt's source code.
    • Include a copy of the LGPLv3 license files with your software's documentation, under a section for 3rd-party licenses used by your software (Note: The LGPLv3 is treated as the GPLv3 plus additional sections)
    • Explicitly assign an open-source license to your software too. (This step legally gives your readers permission to modify and release copies of your code)
    • Include a copy of your program's source code with your executable.

    (Usual disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer)

    Both the executable and the code will be put on an flash drive and are available to the reader.

    If you don't mind sharing your software with the general public (instead of just those who read your thesis), publish it on a code hosting service like GitHub in addition to your flash drive.

    @KroMignon said in Qt usage in thesis:

    for license questions you have to contact the Qt Company: for example with this form https://www.qt.io/contact-us/other

    That's more for commercial licenses, I believe.

    Any source that can answer questions about the LGPL can answer the OP's question, since this is not Qt-specific.



  • @JKSH Thanks for your response.
    I made sure to satisfy the points which you've mentioned and I think that it's OK this way.

    Sorry for the delayed response, last weeks were pretty busy haha.


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