Qt Programming Language



  • @JKSH I'm reading the tutorials, and I'm searching for an important part of programming language that makes a program's accessibility features show up from the beginning, but it's not in any of the tutorials. A blind guy who contacted me via Email a few days ago, who says he's not even a programmer, told me about something he referred to as "Tab Stops". These are, from what he explained, parameters that one can get to by pressing the Tab and Shift+Tab keys. According to his explanation, a tab stop is like a place marker in a window that can be reached with the tab key. Some applications have the field name and
    data for their tab stops in a different order than the actual
    controls, which means that when we tab around, we end up activating
    unintended things. Where do I search for how to program those? In regards to gender-specific text replacement, this same guy told me about something he called "Verbal Analytics". In his explanation regarding this parameter, he says that there are databases that analyze writing statistically; they indicate
    which words are used, how they are used, how most sentences in the
    piece of writing are constructed, etc. Does that parameter work in C++? If so, is that the same concept you were telling me about? I'm confused on this one!


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I tried downloading Visual Studio Community 2015 from the link you mentioned, but it won't let me unless I join some program in order to access previous versions. What's up with that, I wonder?

    Do you mean https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/vs/older-downloads/ ? That's just Microsoft's way of encouraging people to use the latest version (2017). Are you willing to create an account to get Visual Studio 2015?

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I'm reading the tutorials, and I'm searching for an important part of programming language that makes a program's accessibility features show up from the beginning, but it's not in any of the tutorials.

    The tutorial is for learning the basics of C++. Accessibility features, tab stops, and verbal analytics are a lot more advanced, so they are not in that tutorial.

    Please focus on learning the basics first, before you move on to advanced topics. This will take time: A few weeks, at the very least.

    "Verbal Analytics".

    ...

    Does that parameter work in C++? If so, is that the same concept you were telling me about? I'm confused on this one!

    No, I was talking about something much simplier called string manipulation. Verbal analytics is a sophisticated mathematical/statistical analysis technique. You don't need this to generate gender-specific text.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I tried downloading Visual Studio Community 2015 from the link you mentioned, but it won't let me unless I join some program in order to access previous versions. What's up with that, I wonder?

    Do you mean https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/vs/older-downloads/ ? That's just Microsoft's way of encouraging people to use the latest version (2017). Are you willing to create an account to get Visual Studio 2015?

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I'm reading the tutorials, and I'm searching for an important part of programming language that makes a program's accessibility features show up from the beginning, but it's not in any of the tutorials.

    The tutorial is for learning the basics of C++. Accessibility features, tab stops, and verbal analytics are a lot more advanced, so they are not in that tutorial.

    Please focus on learning the basics first, before you move on to advanced topics. This will take time: A few weeks, at the very least.

    "Verbal Analytics".

    ...

    Does that parameter work in C++? If so, is that the same concept you were telling me about? I'm confused on this one!

    No, I was talking about something much simplier called string manipulation. Verbal analytics is a sophisticated mathematical/statistical analysis technique. You don't need this to generate gender-specific text.

    Is creating an account at that link something where I would have to give them any personally identifyable information like credit card numbers? If not, I'm absolutely willing to create an account to access older downloads.



  • @Annabelle
    It should not ask for anything like a credit card. It will probably ask for an existing account you have with MS, or create a new one. You will have to supply it with your email address, I would not expect anything more than that.



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    It should not ask for anything like a credit card. It will probably ask for an existing account you have with MS, or create a new one. You will have to supply it with your email address, I would not expect anything more than that.

    Now that I've done that, how do I access the download of Visual Studio 2015?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    It should not ask for anything like a credit card. It will probably ask for an existing account you have with MS, or create a new one. You will have to supply it with your email address, I would not expect anything more than that.

    Now that I've done that, how do I access the download of Visual Studio 2015?

    Go to https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/vs/older-downloads/ and click "Download" in the Visual Studio 2015 section.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    It should not ask for anything like a credit card. It will probably ask for an existing account you have with MS, or create a new one. You will have to supply it with your email address, I would not expect anything more than that.

    Now that I've done that, how do I access the download of Visual Studio 2015?

    Go to https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/vs/older-downloads/ and click "Download" in the Visual Studio 2015 section.

    I tried that, but unfortunately it gave me the 2017 version instead. I wonder if there's a direct link to the 2015 version.



  • @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/vs/older-downloads/

    if you look lower down the page there is a link for downloading the 2015 version too.



  • @kenchan said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/vs/older-downloads/

    if you look lower down the page there is a link for downloading the 2015 version too.

    I can't find it. My screenreader shows a link that says "Free Download", but it's the 2017 version.



  • @Annabelle
    Well I don't know what it looks like in a screen reader but there is a link called 'Expand All' when that is expanded there is a button to click for downloading.

    It will ask you for your Microsoft login details. You have to be a member of the Visual Studio Subscription site, you can sign up for free and get the free stuff after that.
    I think they are only giving access to old stuff through this site.



  • @kenchan said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    Well I don't know what it looks like in a screen reader but there is a link called 'Expand All' when that is expanded there is a button to click for downloading.

    It will ask you for your Microsoft login details. You have to be a member of the Visual Studio Subscription site, you can sign up for free and get the free stuff after that.
    I think they are only giving access to old stuff through this site.

    I did that, but still nothing.



  • @Annabelle
    Hi. We cannot say about screen-reader access, but I think the direct link for the VS2015 download is

    https://my.visualstudio.com/Downloads?q=visual studio 2015&wt.mc_id=o~msft~vscom~older-downloads

    It will still make you log into your MS account to access it, but hopefully that route will work for you.



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    Hi. We cannot say about screen-reader access, but I think the direct link for the VS2015 download is

    https://my.visualstudio.com/Downloads?q=visual studio 2015&wt.mc_id=o~msft~vscom~older-downloads

    It will still make you log into your MS account to access it, but hopefully that route will work for you.

    Now that I've got Visual Studio Community 2015 installed, what do I do next?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Now that I've got Visual Studio Community 2015 installed, what do I do next?

    Great! Just to double-check: During installation, did you select the option for C++ development?

    Your next step is to start making your way through the tutorials, starting from Chapter 0. Sections 0.1 to 0.5 provide introductory knowledge; section 0.6 "Installing an Integrated Development Environment" talks about installing Visual Studio (which you have already done); section 0.7 "Compiling your first program" is where the really important stuff begins. Make sure you follow the instructions carefully!



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Now that I've got Visual Studio Community 2015 installed, what do I do next?

    Great! Just to double-check: During installation, did you select the option for C++ development?

    Your next step is to start making your way through the tutorials, starting from Chapter 0. Sections 0.1 to 0.5 provide introductory knowledge; section 0.6 "Installing an Integrated Development Environment" talks about installing Visual Studio (which you have already done); section 0.7 "Compiling your first program" is where the really important stuff begins. Make sure you follow the instructions carefully!

    It didn't give me that option in the initial installation. I had to run it again and press Enter on the "Modify" button, and then check the checkboxes next to the appropriate options for programming language components. The one I couldn't find was "C++ Development". I did, however, find "Visual C++". Is that the one you mean? Also, it installed, in addition to Visual Studio 2015, two programs with which I'm not familiar. Microsoft Silverlight, and Microsoft Expression. What do these programs do? Are they necessary components for running Visual Studio Community? If not, is there a way to safely uninstall them without taking away from Visual Studio Community? Also, this new installation has caused my machine to take a little more time between the Windows Logon screen and JAWS starting up. What's up with that, I wonder?


  • Moderators

    Sorry for the late reply.

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    It didn't give me that option in the initial installation. I had to run it again and press Enter on the "Modify" button, and then check the checkboxes next to the appropriate options for programming language components. The one I couldn't find was "C++ Development". I did, however, find "Visual C++". Is that the one you mean?

    Yes, that's the one I meant. Install "Visual C++" so that you can build C++ programs.

    Also, it installed, in addition to Visual Studio 2015, two programs with which I'm not familiar. Microsoft Silverlight, and Microsoft Expression. What do these programs do? Are they necessary components for running Visual Studio Community?

    Microsoft Silverlight is a technology to create rich interactive websites, similar to Adobe Flash. However, both Silverlight and Flash have fallen out of favour these days.

    Microsoft Expression is a program to edit HTML documents.

    Neither component is necessary to run Visual Studio Community.

    If not, is there a way to safely uninstall them without taking away from Visual Studio Community?

    If you click the "Modify" button again, are you able to uncheck the checkboxes for Silverlight and Expression?

    Also, this new installation has caused my machine to take a little more time between the Windows Logon screen and JAWS starting up. What's up with that, I wonder?

    I'm not sure. None of the Visual Studio components run at startup so they shouldn't have any impact on startup time.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    Sorry for the late reply.

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    It didn't give me that option in the initial installation. I had to run it again and press Enter on the "Modify" button, and then check the checkboxes next to the appropriate options for programming language components. The one I couldn't find was "C++ Development". I did, however, find "Visual C++". Is that the one you mean?

    Yes, that's the one I meant. Install "Visual C++" so that you can build C++ programs.

    Also, it installed, in addition to Visual Studio 2015, two programs with which I'm not familiar. Microsoft Silverlight, and Microsoft Expression. What do these programs do? Are they necessary components for running Visual Studio Community?

    Microsoft Silverlight is a technology to create rich interactive websites, similar to Adobe Flash. However, both Silverlight and Flash have fallen out of favour these days.

    Microsoft Expression is a program to edit HTML documents.

    Neither component is necessary to run Visual Studio Community.

    If not, is there a way to safely uninstall them without taking away from Visual Studio Community?

    If you click the "Modify" button again, are you able to uncheck the checkboxes for Silverlight and Expression?

    Also, this new installation has caused my machine to take a little more time between the Windows Logon screen and JAWS starting up. What's up with that, I wonder?

    I'm not sure. None of the Visual Studio components run at startup so they shouldn't have any impact on startup time.

    Now that I've installed the Visual C++ programming language component, what do I do next?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Now that I've installed the Visual C++ programming language component, what do I do next?

    The next thing to do is to follow the tutorial and learn C++.

    Just to double-check: Are you willing to spend time and effort to learn programming? It will take you at least a few weeks to learn the basics of C++. After that, it will take you at least a few months to learn the various features you need and to produce the program that you've been describing.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Now that I've installed the Visual C++ programming language component, what do I do next?

    The next thing to do is to follow the tutorial and learn C++.

    Just to double-check: Are you willing to spend time and effort to learn programming? It will take you at least a few weeks to learn the basics of C++. After that, it will take you at least a few months to learn the various features you need and to produce the program that you've been describing.

    You ask if I'm willing to spend time and effort learning programming? The answer to that is a resounding "Yes!" I'm willing to learn anything, as long as I can take it one step at a time, and as long as there aren't too many graphics for my screenreader to have to jump over. So a few weeks to learn the basics, and a few months to learn the concepts you mention as far as "if" statements, variables, and string manipulation goes?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    You ask if I'm willing to spend time and effort learning programming? The answer to that is a resounding "Yes!" I'm willing to learn anything, as long as I can take it one step at a time, and as long as there aren't too many graphics for my screenreader to have to jump over. So a few weeks to learn the basics, and a few months to learn the concepts you mention as far as "if" statements, variables, and string manipulation goes?

    That's great! It is refreshing to see your enthusiasm for learning.

    Concepts like variables and "if" statements are part of basic C++, so I think you should cover those within a few weeks. I would say string manipulation is intermediate-level. Let me know when you've finished learning the basics, and I'll be happy to teach you more about string manipulation.

    GUIs, accessibility features, and building the applications are much more advanced -- these will take you a few months (at least) to understand.

    Anyway, all the best with learning C++ through learncpp.com. As I mentioned before, work through all of chapter 0, all of chapter 1, section 2.1, and section 2.6. After that, search for the concepts I mentioned.

    Feel free to ask here if something is unclear in the tutorial.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    You ask if I'm willing to spend time and effort learning programming? The answer to that is a resounding "Yes!" I'm willing to learn anything, as long as I can take it one step at a time, and as long as there aren't too many graphics for my screenreader to have to jump over. So a few weeks to learn the basics, and a few months to learn the concepts you mention as far as "if" statements, variables, and string manipulation goes?

    That's great! It is refreshing to see your enthusiasm for learning.

    Concepts like variables and "if" statements are part of basic C++, so I think you should cover those within a few weeks. I would say string manipulation is intermediate-level. Let me know when you've finished learning the basics, and I'll be happy to teach you more about string manipulation.

    GUIs, accessibility features, and building the applications are much more advanced -- these will take you a few months (at least) to understand.

    Anyway, all the best with learning C++ through learncpp.com. As I mentioned before, work through all of chapter 0, all of chapter 1, section 2.1, and section 2.6. After that, search for the concepts I mentioned.

    Feel free to ask here if something is unclear in the tutorial.

    I tried compiling a Qt version of "Hello World" in Visual Studio, but it said there were a bunch of errors, despite the fact that I copied and pasted the code into a text document from the Qt Documentation. Then I pasted that code into Visual Studio's "Text Editor". On http://www.learncpp.com, there's a different way of printing the "Hello World" project, where the code has something called "cout", which I don't understand. What's the difference between these two codes? That is, the Qt code of "Hello World", and the C++ code of "Hello World"? I'm confused on this one!


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I tried compiling a Qt version of "Hello World" in Visual Studio, but it said there were a bunch of errors, despite the fact that I copied and pasted the code into a text document from the Qt Documentation.

    Before you can use Qt in Visual Studio, you need to perform some additional setup. For now, let's skip all this complexity. Just follow the tutorial without using Qt for now.

    Then I pasted that code into Visual Studio's "Text Editor". On http://www.learncpp.com, there's a different way of printing the "Hello World" project, where the code has something called "cout", which I don't understand. What's the difference between these two codes? That is, the Qt code of "Hello World", and the C++ code of "Hello World"? I'm confused on this one!

    A "Hello World" program is just a very simple program to help programmers to start using a new language or library. These are not unique; there are many variants of C++ "Hello Worlds" and many variants of Qt "Hello Worlds".

    • A C++ "Hello World" program introduces the programmer to the C++ language.
    • A Qt "Hello World" program introduces the programmer to the Qt library.

    cout stands for "character output". It is a place where your program can display some text.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I tried compiling a Qt version of "Hello World" in Visual Studio, but it said there were a bunch of errors, despite the fact that I copied and pasted the code into a text document from the Qt Documentation.

    Before you can use Qt in Visual Studio, you need to perform some additional setup. For now, let's skip all this complexity. Just follow the tutorial without using Qt for now.

    Then I pasted that code into Visual Studio's "Text Editor". On http://www.learncpp.com, there's a different way of printing the "Hello World" project, where the code has something called "cout", which I don't understand. What's the difference between these two codes? That is, the Qt code of "Hello World", and the C++ code of "Hello World"? I'm confused on this one!

    A "Hello World" program is just a very simple program to help programmers to start using a new language or library. These are not unique; there are many variants of C++ "Hello Worlds" and many variants of Qt "Hello Worlds".

    • A C++ "Hello World" program introduces the programmer to the C++ language.
    • A Qt "Hello World" program introduces the programmer to the Qt library.

    cout stands for "character output". It is a place where your program can display some text.

    If I lose focus with the text editor in Visual Studio while performing the examples in the tutorial, is there a keyboard shortcut for me to put it in focus again?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    If I lose focus with the text editor in Visual Studio while performing the examples in the tutorial, is there a keyboard shortcut for me to put it in focus again?

    Could you please describe what you were doing up to the moment where focus is lost?



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    If I lose focus with the text editor in Visual Studio while performing the examples in the tutorial, is there a keyboard shortcut for me to put it in focus again?

    Could you please describe what you were doing up to the moment where focus is lost?

    I created a new project, which took me to the editor where there was some example text, then I deleted what was there. Next, I went to the tutorial where the "Hello World" code was, and I copied the code to the clipboard. When I pressed Alt+Tab to return to the text editor in Visual Studio to paste the newly-copied code, my screenreader didn't show it (the text editor), just a blank screen.


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I created a new project, which took me to the editor where there was some example text, then I deleted what was there. Next, I went to the tutorial where the "Hello World" code was, and I copied the code to the clipboard. When I pressed Alt+Tab to return to the text editor in Visual Studio to paste the newly-copied code, my screenreader didn't show it (the text editor), just a blank screen.

    Could it be that the screenreader was silent because there was no text inside the editor? What happens when you try to paste the newly-copied code?

    Also, try using Ctrl+Tab to cycle between sub-windows inside Visual Studio.

    One final word of advise: Please don't wait for me (or anyone else) to reply before you take action. Take the initiative to try different things (and search on Google) to see if you can solve the problem before someone replies.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    I created a new project, which took me to the editor where there was some example text, then I deleted what was there. Next, I went to the tutorial where the "Hello World" code was, and I copied the code to the clipboard. When I pressed Alt+Tab to return to the text editor in Visual Studio to paste the newly-copied code, my screenreader didn't show it (the text editor), just a blank screen.

    Could it be that the screenreader was silent because there was no text inside the editor? What happens when you try to paste the newly-copied code?

    Also, try using Ctrl+Tab to cycle between sub-windows inside Visual Studio.

    One final word of advise: Please don't wait for me (or anyone else) to reply before you take action. Take the initiative to try different things (and search on Google) to see if you can solve the problem before someone replies.

    I'm not sure why this didn't work, but I pasted the Hello World code in the text editor window, then when building the project, there were some errors. Even though I pasted the code without any changes.
    0_1540994545531_8d93dc3f-313e-41be-a836-59bb363386f9-image.png



  • @Annabelle
    [EDIT: I have scrapped my suggestions here, read @mrjj's post below. He is right because of the error message number. You are using a .cs file extension and compiling your code as C# instead of C++ in Visual Studio. Change your filename extension to .cpp. You need to create a completely different kind of project in Visual Studio, it must be something like a "C++ project" and not a "CSharp project".]


  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    Hi
    Im wondering about the file extension.
    Its .cs which would indicate a c sharp program
    and not a c++ one ?
    Maybe a wrong template was used to create it ?


  • Moderators

    @mrjj said in Qt Programming Language:

    Hi
    Im wondering about the file extension.
    Its .cs which would indicate a c sharp program
    and not a c++ one ?
    Maybe a wrong template was used to create it ?

    @mrjj is right; you have created a C# project instead of a C++ project. When you create a project, select "Visual C++".

    I can't remember what Visual Studio 2015 is like, but Visual Studio 2017 lets me choose Visual C++ > Windows Desktop > Windows Console Application.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @mrjj said in Qt Programming Language:

    Hi
    Im wondering about the file extension.
    Its .cs which would indicate a c sharp program
    and not a c++ one ?
    Maybe a wrong template was used to create it ?

    @mrjj is right; you have created a C# project instead of a C++ project. When you create a project, select "Visual C++".

    I can't remember what Visual Studio 2015 is like, but Visual Studio 2017 lets me choose Visual C++ > Windows Desktop > Windows Console Application.

    Here's another screenshot. This time, I actually created a C++ project, but it still says there's an error. 0_1541007381736_537203d4-62e9-49e1-9e39-5c7e079ba05e-image.png



  • @Annabelle
    This is to do with the VS/MS compiler. Paste the following line:

    #include "stdafx.h"
    

    into your file, as the first line, somewhere above your existing #include <iostream>.

    Alternatively you can remove a compiler switch (/Yu) in your VS project, but I think the above is easiest.



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    This is to do with the VS/MS compiler. Paste the following line:

    #include "stdafx.h"
    

    into your file, as the first line, somewhere above your existing #include <iostream>.

    Alternatively you remover a compiler switch (/Yu) in your VS project, but I think the above is easiest.

    What exactly is "stdafx"? Is it an initializing parameter?


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    What exactly is "stdafx"? Is it an initializing parameter?

    You can find an answer by searching on Google or another search engine. Programmers must use search engines often, so make it a habit.

    Here is an answer: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/2976035/purpose-of-stdafx-h



  • I don't know what I did wrong this time, but here's another screenshot of an error.
    0_1541225135389_7d1ba768-18a7-4ec3-b4aa-26271bc951dc-image.png



  • @Annabelle
    When you did the paste, this time you have accidentally actually copied the actual line numbers 1 to 6 onto lines 1 to 6. This is in addition to the line numbers which VS shows to the left of every line you write, and your screenreader probably reads out to you. Which means that prior to your #include at line 7 the first 6 lines are unacceptable. You need to delete, or change to blank lines, your first 6 lines.

    When you try to compile code, the very first error is highly significant. Once the compiler hits something erroneous, very often it does not do a great a job at "recovering" from the error such that it gives sensible errors (or not) for whatever follows. So you can end up with loads of "spurious" errors after the first one. Concentrate each time on fixing whatever the very first error reported is, then try compiling again and see where it gets you.

    Now, there is an important thing here in VS which I do not know whether you are aware of/your screenreader tells you about. When we look at the lines you have shown us in the screenshot above, we see the lines the compiler does not like having a "squiggly red underline" shown. For us we can immediately see those and know something is wrong. Does your screenreader tell you about these? In your current code, the very first line (numbered 1) has the actual text of the number 1 on it. Since that is wrong, VS squiggle-red-underlines that 1. It would be very helpful to you if your screenreader can make you aware of such lines, but perhaps it cannot? Also, I believe that if I hovered my mouse over a red-squiggle-underline VS would put up a "tooltip" giving me the error message for what is wrong: again, are you able to be informed about that?



  • @JonB said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle
    When you did the paste, this time you have accidentally actually copied the actual line numbers 1 to 6 onto lines 1 to 6. This is in addition to the line numbers which VS shows to the left of every line you write, and your screenreader probably reads out to you. Which means that prior to your #include at line 7 the first 6 lines are unacceptable. You need to delete, or change to blank lines, your first 6 lines.

    When you try to compile code, the very first error is highly significant. Once the compiler hits something erroneous, very often it does not do a great a job at "recovering" from the error such that it gives sensible errors (or not) for whatever follows. So you can end up with loads of "spurious" errors after the first one. Concentrate each time on fixing whatever the very first error reported is, then try compiling again and see where it gets you.

    Now, there is an important thing here in VS which I do not know whether you are aware of/your screenreader tells you about. When we look at the lines you have shown us in the screenshot above, we see the lines the compiler does not like having a "squiggly red underline" shown. For us we can immediately see those and know something is wrong. Does your screenreader tell you about these? In your current code, the very first line (numbered 1) has the actual text of the number 1 on it. Since that is wrong, VS squiggle-red-underlines that 1. It would be very helpful to you if your screenreader can make you aware of such lines, but perhaps it cannot? Also, I believe that if I hovered my mouse over a red-squiggle-underline VS would put up a "tooltip" giving me the error message for what is wrong: again, are you able to be informed about that?

    My screenreader can't tell if an underline has a color or is squigly. It can say _ (underline). Is that the mark you're talking about? I'm confused!



  • Here's a screenshot of yet another error. I'm not sure what I did wrong. I deleted the lines with pasted numbers, but even Visual Studio didn't like something I did then.
    0_1541260099015_7152e5c5-4f99-4b63-ab56-23a1c4260150-image.png


  • Moderators

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    My screenreader can't tell if an underline has a color or is squigly. It can say _ (underline). Is that the mark you're talking about?

    In your latest screenshot, there was a red squiggly line underneath "#include". Did your screenreader announce that? If not, don't worry -- the error is repeated under the Error List pane: "cannot open source Hello World! file "stdafx.h". Did your screenreader announce that?

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Here's a screenshot of yet another error.

    Change <stdafx.h> to "stdafx.h". In other words, change the angular brackets to double quotation marks.



  • @JKSH said in Qt Programming Language:

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    My screenreader can't tell if an underline has a color or is squigly. It can say _ (underline). Is that the mark you're talking about?

    In your latest screenshot, there was a red squiggly line underneath "#include". Did your screenreader announce that? If not, don't worry -- the error is repeated under the Error List pane: "cannot open source Hello World! file "stdafx.h". Did your screenreader announce that?

    @Annabelle said in Qt Programming Language:

    Here's a screenshot of yet another error.

    Change <stdafx.h> to "stdafx.h". In other words, change the angular brackets to double quotation marks.

    It seems that when I type #include "stdafx.h", the quotation marks, for some reason, are automatically changed to angular brackets (<>). How do I prevent that from happening?


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