SplashScreen stay on TaskManager



  • Hi All,..first, Happy New year to all :)

    I'm brand new with Qt,...no experience for now,..but I learn fast. :)

    I'm experimenting my first Qt application wich is to show only a splash screen.
    but the program remain in task manager..

    here the code.

    //#include "mainwindow.h"
    #include <QApplication>
    #include <QSplashScreen>
    #include <QTimer>
    
    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        QApplication a(argc, argv);
        QSplashScreen *splash=new QSplashScreen;
        splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo.png"));
        splash->show();
        QTimer::singleShot(2500,splash,SLOT(close()));
        return a.exec();
     
    }
    

    not sure to understand all,...for now I see 28 video tutorial on youtube..
    and want to learn more about this.

    thank you for your help.


  • Qt Champions 2016

    Hi and welcome
    so the timer that calls close , it not working`?



  • @mrjj said in SplashScreen stay on TaskManager:

    Hi and welcome
    so the timer that calls close , it not working`?

    Thank you,..

    yes all seem to work fine,....except that the application stay in my Task manager.
    :\


  • Qt Champions 2016

    Oh. that way.
    Well you dont have a MainWindow.
    QApplication will close application when the last window is closed.
    Not sure it knows about QSplashScreen.

    But when you dont have any mainwindow/top level widgets, it keeps running.

    You can make it exit calling quit() but its hard with just a QSplashScreen.

    So as you see in tut 28. he does have Mainwindow also ?



  • @mrjj said in SplashScreen stay on TaskManager:

    Oh. that way.
    Well you dont have a MainWindow.
    QApplication will close application when the last window is closed.
    Not sure it knows about QSplashScreen.

    But when you dont have any mainwindow/top level widgets, it keeps running.

    You can make it exit calling quit() but its hard with just a QSplashScreen.

    So as you see in tut 28. he does have Mainwindow also ?

    yes the tutorial have windows application...
    but I don't need it..

    in fact my project is simple,...
    I want to make a splashscreen with PNG transparency,..(without windows form)
    so I don't know if this is the way to go for it..

    I want to start with this,..and then,..add features...to be customized,.like time delay, fadein/fadeout, animated PNG etc...


  • Qt Champions 2016

    @QtA_
    Ok, "(without windows form)" means with no borders or caption etc?

    I think you can use splashscreen for this but not sure its really needed.

    Will it be sort of a class others can use , as a super splashscreen thing or
    what is the goal ?

    Well you current issue can be fixed by calling apps quit() when you want the app to exit.
    like 2 timers. one call close for splashscreen and other call quit()
    but it all depends on how u want it to work.



  • @mrjj said in SplashScreen stay on TaskManager:

    @QtA_
    Ok, "(without windows form)" means with no borders or caption etc?

    I think you can use splashscreen for this but not sure its really needed.

    Will it be sort of a class others can use , as a super splashscreen thing or
    what is the goal ?

    Well you current issue can be fixed by calling apps quit() when you want the app to exit.
    like 2 timers. one call close for splashscreen and other call quit()
    but it all depends on how u want it to work.

    that's why I'm here :)

    I'm a biginner with C++, so need to understand manything actually.
    my english is also not very good, but its ok I think. :)

    The goal should be something like this:

    1. create an EXE allowing parameters to show splashscreen.

    ex:
    mysplash.exe "c:/my images/logo1.png" /d:3 /fi:1 /fo:1

    wich:
    /d = delay
    /fi = fade in time delay
    /fo = fade out time delay

    then,...few version after,...allowing to execute splash with mutliple image running to make an animated splash with PNG files.. :)


  • Qt Champions 2016

    @QtA_
    ahh, sort of fancy app loader. :)
    well that is a fun project.

    You english is fine. :)

    That should be possible for a first project. Good luck and feel free to ask.



  • @mrjj said in SplashScreen stay on TaskManager:

    @QtA_
    ahh, sort of fancy app loader. :)
    well that is a fun project.

    You english is fine. :)

    That should be possible for a first project. Good luck and feel free to ask.

    Thank you very much,..
    I'm a fancy girl :)

    return a.quit();
    

    do not close the process,..do I miss something ?


  • Qt Champions 2016

    @QtA_
    Hi
    do you now have
    return a.exec();
    return a.quit();

    ?

    it stays inside a.exec().

    you can try
    QTimer::singleShot(2500,&app,SLOT(quit()));
    should kill it all after 2,5 secs.
    U must keep return a.exec(); to use timers. Its drives the eventloop :)



  • @mrjj said in SplashScreen stay on TaskManager:

    @QtA_
    Hi
    do you now have
    return a.exec();
    return a.quit();

    ?

    it stays inside a.exec().

    yes


  • Qt Champions 2016

    @QtA_
    You need to send it signal to quit.
    Try
    QTimer::singleShot(2500,&app,SLOT(quit()));
    dont remove the exec() part.
    its very important to use signals.



  • nope,..:( still active.

    #include <QApplication>
    #include <QSplashScreen>
    #include <QTimer>
    
    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        QApplication a(argc, argv);
        QSplashScreen *splash=new QSplashScreen;
        splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo.png"));
        splash->show();
        QTimer::singleShot(2500,splash,SLOT(close()));
        QTimer::singleShot(2500,splash,SLOT(quit()));
    
        return a.exec();
        return a.quit();
    
    }
    

  • Qt Champions 2016

    @QtA_
    You are asking it wrongly :)

    QTimer::singleShot(2500,splash,SLOT(quit())); <<<< wrong object. should be &app

    you are asking the timer to call quit() on splash, which splash dont have.

    QTimer::singleShot(2500,&app,SLOT(quit()));

    Update:
    Also
    The return statement will make it leave a function
    so

    return a.exec();
    return a.quit(); <<< u can never, ever get here :)



  • Thank you very much !! :)
    so i've added:

    QTimer::singleShot(2500,&a,SLOT(quit()));
    

    and removed

    return a.exec();
    

    seem to work fine now :)

    Question...

    why do I need to put time delay on quit if already the time done ?
    I mean,..

    QTimer::singleShot(2500,&a,SLOT(quit()));
    

    must be

    QTimer::singleShot(0,&a,SLOT(quit()));
    

    ?


  • Qt Champions 2016

    @QtA_
    Hi
    Np.

    Does it display long enough with
    QTimer::singleShot(0,&a,SLOT(quit())); ?

    Then its ok.



  • ok ...I've change the close by the quit.
    instead adding a new line. :)

    Thanks again for all your help.
    Angie xx


  • Qt Champions 2016

    @QtA_
    Np. Have fun programming. :)


  • Moderators

    You don't need to force the app quit. It's not very flexible in the long run. By default Qt app quits automatically when a last window is closed. This is controlled in two places: on application level with setQuitOnLastWindowClosed (the default is true, so no need to change that). The other place is at the widget level with an attribute Qt::WA_QuitOnClose. This attribute is by default enabled for top level windows i.e. widgets with flag Qt::Window or Qt::Dialog except for certain types, including menus, tooltips and splashscreen.

    Since a splashscreen is all you have you can just turn the attribute back on:

    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        QApplication a(argc, argv);
        QSplashScreen *splash = new QSplashScreen;
        splash->setAttribute(Qt::WA_QuitOnClose);  // <-- the relevant line
        splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo.png"));
        splash->show();
        QTimer::singleShot(2500,splash,SLOT(close()));
        return a.exec();
    }
    

    Btw. Technically this code leaks memory as you never delete the splash instance. To keep it clean you have couple of options:

    • manually delete the splash after the call to exec
    • add WA_DeleteOnClose attribute to the splash
    • (the easiest and recommended) just create the splash instance on the stack:
    QSplashScreen splash;
    splash.setAttribute(Qt::WA_QuitOnClose);
    splash.setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo.png"));
    splash.show();
    QTimer::singleShot(2500,&splash,SLOT(close()));
    

  • Qt Champions 2016

    @Chris-Kawa
    Much better with WA_QuitOnClose, indeed. :)

    Do you know if QSplashScreen can do anything special compared to a plain QWidget in terms
    of her overall goal? ( sort of fancy launcher )

    Im not sure if a custom widget is not more fun later when she wants animations and fade in/out effects etc. Of Course she can derive from QSplashScreen but I do wonder if it
    give anything of benefit for this use case. ?



  • Thank you guys,,...
    it seem to work,..

    however..many questions in my little brain..

    splash name is my variable right ?
    so may I redefine it many times ?

    #include <QApplication>
    #include <QSplashScreen>
    #include <QTimer>
    
    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        QApplication a(argc, argv);
        QSplashScreen *splash = new QSplashScreen;
        splash->setAttribute(Qt::WA_QuitOnClose);  // <-- the relevant line
        splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo.png"));
        splash->show();
        QTimer::singleShot(2500,splash,SLOT(close()));
        
        splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo1.png"));
        splash->show();
        QTimer::singleShot(2500,splash,SLOT(close()));
        
        return a.exec();
    }
    

    seem it keep always the last image...


  • Moderators

    @mrjj QSplashScreen is pretty basic. It's not well suited for any sort of animations. The easiest route for that would be, indeed, a plain old widget and overriding its paintEvent. Deriving from QSplashScreen would just get in your way.

    @QtA_ You're thinking in line, while what happens is event driven. This code QTimer::singleShot(2500,splash,SLOT(close())); doesn't "wait" for 2.5 seconds. It just schedules the slot to fire in 2.5 seconds and moves on immediately. So this:

    splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo.png"));
    splash->show();
    QTimer::singleShot(2500,splash,SLOT(close()));
    splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo1.png"));
    

    is just the same as this:

    splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo.png"));
    splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo1.png"));
    splash->show();
    QTimer::singleShot(2500,splash,SLOT(close()));
    

    To make it work like you want to you need to schedule the switch to happen some time later, e.g.

    splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo.png")); //set initial image
    QTimer::singleShot(1000, [&]{ splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo1.png")); }); //change it after a second
    QTimer::singleShot(2000, [&]{ splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo2.png")); }); //change it again after 2 seconds etc.
    
    splash->show();
    QTimer::singleShot(2500,splash,SLOT(close()));
    


  • ok,...that work great !
    my PNG animation is now done.. :) thank you.

    However,..there is few questions if you dont mind.
    is the [&] mean to execute what is in the bracket ? {}

    I understand what i'm doing...but I do not understand yet how, when and why to put sometime bracket, [] sometime <> sometime "" or {}
    i'm a little lost on when to use it..
    is there any tutorial who explain this syllabus ?
    Thanks again for all your help :)


  • Qt Champions 2016

    @QtA_ said in SplashScreen stay on TaskManager:
    Hi

    is the [&] mean to execute what is in the bracket ? {}

    Yes its a c++ lambda. Think of it as "in place" function.

    QTimer::singleShot(1000, [&]
    {
    //this is the function body
    splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo1.png"));
    }
    );

    I understand what i'm doing...but I do not understand yet how, when and why to put sometime bracket, [] sometime <> sometime "" or {}

    Oh,  there are many different uses, depending on context.
    { } is often used as a block.
    if (something)  {
    // line 1
    // line 2
    } 
    --
    void somefunc() {
    }
    -----------------------
    [] is used with array or lists. 
    (and also the lambda syntax)
    int list[1000];
    int num=list[1];
    -----------------------
    The <> is often seen with templates. Templates are special c++ thing that allows any type to be used. the compiler will generate the needed code for all used types.
    std::vector<int> mylist; // list of ints.
    

    So its hard to fully answer as its used in many contexts. So you better just ask :)



  • @mrjj said in SplashScreen stay on TaskManager:

    @QtA_ said in SplashScreen stay on TaskManager:
    Hi

    is the [&] mean to execute what is in the bracket ? {}

    Yes its a c++ lambda. Think of it as "in place" function.

    QTimer::singleShot(1000, [&]
    {
    //this is the function body
    splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo1.png"));
    }
    );

    I understand what i'm doing...but I do not understand yet how, when and why to put sometime bracket, [] sometime <> sometime "" or {}

    Oh,  there are many different uses, depending on context.
    { } is often used as a block.
    if (something)  {
    // line 1
    // line 2
    } 
    --
    void somefunc() {
    }
    -----------------------
    [] is used with array or lists. 
    (and also the lambda syntax)
    int list[1000];
    int num=list[1];
    -----------------------
    The <> is often seen with templates. Templates are special c++ thing that allows any type to be used. the compiler will generate the needed code for all used types.
    std::vector<int> mylist; // list of ints.
    

    So its hard to fully answer as its used in many contexts. So you better just ask :)

    Thank you very much !
    Not sure to understand more....but with practice...i'll figure out.. :)
    first,..need to learn what LAMBDA is.. lol ! :)

    in fact,..I use Qt beacause I thought that it had an option for dialog transparency..
    so by putting an image with invisible dialog will do the trick.. :( bad thinking..


  • Qt Champions 2016

    Hi
    No.
    Well lambdas are nameless functions. Its like a normal function but has a funny syntax
    to be allowed to written "in place".
    https://blog.feabhas.com/2014/03/demystifying-c-lambdas/
    So where places you would use a pointer to a function, you can now directly give it the function there.

    .I use Qt beacause I thought that it had an option for dialog transparency.

    Well it does support transparency but it can vary between platforms and windows managers.
    :)


  • Moderators

    @mrjj Lambdas are not anonymous functions. They are anonymous structures with operator(). That's an important distinction, because how would you explain captures on a function?

    @QtA_ LONG READ AHEAD WARNING. Here's a lambdas 101, with examples of the standard algorithms (that was their first use).

    Lets say you have a vector of ints: std::vector<int> v {1,5,3,7};.
    Now you want to sort it. Easy right? You just do std::sort(v.begin(), v.end());. Done.
    Now you want to sort it in reverse. Well there's a template for it: std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), std::greater<int>());, but lets say for a moment that there isn't (or you want to implement that template). How would that be done?

    In C++98 you had to provide your own function:

    bool foo(int a, int b) { return b < a; }
    std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), foo);
    

    or a functor ( a structure with operator()):

    struct Foo {
    bool operator()(int a, int b) const { return b < a; }
    };
    std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), Foo());
    

    std::greater<int> is just such structure, except it is templated so it can be used for anything, not just ints :

    template <typename T> struct Foo {
    bool operator()(const T& a, const T& b) const { return b < a; }
    };
    std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), Foo<int>());
    

    The problem with this is that you had to put these functions or structs somewhere and there often wasn't a good place for it, so they ended up in some utils.h bag of unrelated functions.

    Lambdas were introduced to solve this problem and shorten the syntax. Now you can create such a structure in place. A syntax of a lambda is [](){} (yes, because there were too few brackets in the language so they used all of them ;) ). So now you can write:

    std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), [](int a, int b){ return b < a;});
    

    One line. Lovely. What happens behind the courtains is that compiler secretly generates something like this:

    struct _SomeHorribleGeneratedName_{
    bool operator()(int a, int b) const { return b < a; }
    };
    std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), _SomeHorribleGeneratedName_());
    

    The name the lambda gets is never visible to you, so that's why this is called an anonymous struct. So it's the same as before: () is the argument list, {} is the body of the function. But what's the [] for then?

    Let's take another example:
    Lets say that you now want to find an element 3 in the vector: auto it = std::find(v.begin(), v.end(), 3);. Done. Easy.
    Lets say you want to find first element, that is greater than 2. Now you have to use one of those funky functors:

    struct Foo {
    bool operator()(int a) const { return a > 2; }
    };
    auto it = std::find_if(v.begin(), v.end(), Foo());
    

    How about a lambda?:

    auto it = std::find_if(v.begin(), v.end(), [](int a){ return a > 2; });
    

    Cool. But lets say 2 is not a constant, but some parameter you want to pass to it:

    void foo(int param) {
        auto it = std::find_if(v.begin(), v.end(), [](int a){ return a > param; }); //this won't compile :(
    }
    

    We've got a problem here, because param is not in the scope of the lambda. Remember, that the compiler does this:

    struct _SomeHorribleGeneratedName_ {
    bool operator()(int a) const { return a > param; } //what is param?
    };
    void foo(int param) {
        auto it = std::find_if(v.begin(), v.end(), _SomeHorribleGeneratedName_());
    }
    

    Here's where the [] comes in. It's a capture expression. Here you can "capture" values from the scope into the lambda, so it knows them:

    void foo(int param) {
        auto it = std::find_if(v.begin(), v.end(), [param](int a){ return a > param; }); //ok!
    }
    

    This makes the compiler generate something like this:

    struct _SomeHorribleGeneratedName_ {
       _SomeHorribleGeneratedName_(int p) : param(p) {}
       bool operator()(int a) const { return a > param; }
       int param;
    };
    
    void foo(int param) {
        auto it = std::find_if(v.begin(), v.end(), _SomeHorribleGeneratedName_(param));
    }
    

    So it creates instance of the lambda and passes the captured value with a constructor parameter so that it can be used inside the lambda.
    But what if the param was not int but some large object that we didn't want to copy (or it couldn't be copied)? We can also capture by reference:

    void foo(int param) {
        auto it = std::find_if(v.begin(), v.end(), [&param](int a){ return a > param; }); //see the & before the param name?
    }
    

    and this makes compiler generate something like this:

    struct _SomeHorribleGeneratedName_ {
       _SomeHorribleGeneratedName_(int& p) : param(p) {}
       bool operator()(int a) const { return a > param; }
       int& param; //the param is now a reference
    };
    
    void foo(int param) {
        auto it = std::find_if(v.begin(), v.end(), _SomeHorribleGeneratedName_(param));
    }
    

    In the previous post we used something like [&] for the capture list. What does that mean? It's a shortcut meaning "capture everything we use inside the lambda by reference". It's so you don't have to list all the values you use. So this:

    QTimer::singleShot(1000, [&]{ splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo1.png")); })
    

    is the same as this, but shorter:

    QTimer::singleShot(1000, [&splash]{ splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo1.png")); })
    

    What if we wanted to capture everything by value (copy)? The syntax is [=], so we could write:

    QTimer::singleShot(1000, [splash]{ splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo1.png")); })
    

    or

    QTimer::singleShot(1000, [=]{ splash->setPixmap(QPixmap ("C:/Users/public/test/Logo1.png")); })
    

    ant this would copy the splash pointer instead of creating a reference to it.
    If you have couple of params you want to capture, some by value, some by reference, you can mix and match: [param1, &param2, param3]. param1 and param3 will be captured by value and param2 by reference.

    That's pretty much all you'll need to know about lambdas most of the time. There are a couple more related topics - mutable lambdas and generalized lambdas (lambdas that create template structs, whoa!), but this was suppose to be 101 so...

    Hope this wasn't too boring ;)


  • Qt Champions 2016

    @Chris-Kawa
    Yes, You are right. was too oversimplified wrong explanation.
    Was aiming to explain what lambdas are without going into class and operator () details
    but now she get the grand tour :) so it will all be clear \o/

    Very nice 101. Should be on the wiki :)



  • wow,..is that supposed to help ? LOL ! :)
    Thank you very much for all explaination,..I really need to make tests with this.
    maybe one day I'll be one of yours..(guru) :)

    for now I cut/Paste your explaination on my notebook :)
    thanks again.

    Angie xx


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