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Console Applications


  • Qt Champions 2019

    @ambershark said in Console Applications:

    You don't necessarily need to learn the command line stuff to succeed as a professional developer

    I disagree with this statement. As professional developer you should know how to use command line. You often need to use it directly or write scripts. And besides the need to use it you should know it to better understand how the system is working.



  • To both of of you: good points thanks.
    I can assure you I've made my decision and in few days I will install the latest version of Ubuntu and (as I told you dear friend ambershark) I will ask to suggest me a good tut to help me start using the OS (and I know there are many tuts on the Web, but I'd like to see your suggestions).

    Thank you very Much.


  • Lifetime Qt Champion

    @tomy said in Console Applications:

    Ubuntu

    Hi
    Ubuntu comes default with a manager called unity.
    If you want a more windows like
    experience then (also) try
    http://www.kubuntu.org/
    It uses KDE and is very easy to navigate if already windows trained.
    All ubuntu have good docs
    https://help.ubuntu.com/kubuntu/desktopguide/C/ (old)
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community

    The files system is the biggest surprise. (mostly good)
    But a new linux user , the following is good to know from day one:
    1:
    Its case sensitive
    in same folder you can have a.txt and A.txt and its NOT same file.
    So anything with paths/filenames, be extra careful. One big letter in wrong place
    and it's not valid.
    2:
    To run scripts or exe files u download, you need to flag them as "can be run"
    chmod +x filename ( in correct case)
    Often you can also right click and set it.
    3:
    You often have to use "./" in front of files to say "in this folder"
    say you are in a folder and it has test.exe
    If you dont say ./text.exe it will say it cant find file which is often
    confusing as you are looking at it :)
    4:
    If safe to try a billion new programs. Linux has a much tighter systems for "apps"
    and once you remove them , it's like they were never there so unlike windows
    it won't gobble up or get slow over time. (in the same way)
    5:
    Most things you do in windows have a just as good solution in Linux. Just
    have to find the right program. Only program i could never really find a good match for
    was Photoshop but gimp is close. So if you think that some app in linux sucks then
    go to app center and have a look. Often there are 10 alternatives to just click Install on and
    use. Like an app store for Desktop. But not limited apps but full blown desktop programs.
    What is not to like :)


  • Moderators

    @jsulm said in Console Applications:

    @ambershark said in Console Applications:

    You don't necessarily need to learn the command line stuff to succeed as a professional developer

    I disagree with this statement. As professional developer you should know how to use command line. You often need to use it directly or write scripts. And besides the need to use it you should know it to better understand how the system is working.

    I can't imagine life without the command line. But I have worked with people over the years that didn't know how to use it at all. Some knew, but barely. They were well paid professional developers.

    While I agree with what you're saying and think that people should definitely know CLI stuff, I also know professionals that don't. Which is why I made that statement.

    That being said, they were not very good. Especially compared to those of us that knew it. :) So I totally get where you're coming from when you say that.



  • As a side note, if you want to practice Linux command line but don't want to install Linux, you can start with Cygwin. If I have the power of the administrator when working with Windows I usually eventually install Cygwin on it and keep a Cygwin terminal window open. Almost all the basic command line tools (which are not very low-level system related) are there. Including programming language compilers and interpreters: gcc, python, perl...

    If you know Linux command line it's an enticing option to do file management etc. in a Cygwin terminal. Or running the compiler and git commands.


  • Moderators

    @Eeli-K said in Console Applications:

    As a side note, if you want to practice Linux command line but don't want to install Linux, you can start with Cygwin.

    Or Bash on Windows 10: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-au/commandline/wsl/about

    (But if @tomy has already installed full Ubuntu, he should just start with that instead of now downloading Cygwin or Bash)



  • Thank you all very much.
    Yes, I don't like those stuffs and like to have the whole thing.


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